Can your cabling support the demands of the future?

Are you equipped to deliver the healthcare of the future? In the first of our five-part blog series, we explore key areas of consideration to help you make the decisions that will improve the lives of patients, doctors, and nurses.

Technical innovations are driving faster, more accurate diagnoses, streamlined care and better outcomes for patients. By 2021, the health technology sector is expected to reach $280 billion, according the 2019 US and Global Health Care Industry Outlook report by Deloitte*.

What’s more, Deloitte suggests the US healthcare industry is moving towards a model based on value rather than volume. This means keeping people healthy and out of the hospital will be key. Rather than seeing people as patients, healthcare providers should treat them more like members – a shift that could result in greater customer loyalty. The successful deployment and management of wireless technology can ease this transition by providing a reliable, always on network which is critical to the success of future digital tools, workflow and patient care.

But wireless data transfer is only as reliable and fast as the infrastructure that supports it. Data has to be funneled through a cable at some point, and you may find that your existing cabling infrastructure can’t keep up with the demands of the modern healthcare organization.

Too often, cabling is neglected when planning for new technology investments. The reality is that robust cabling is essential for the success of wireless technologies. It provides the reliability and performance that always-on healthcare networks demand. A 10G infrastructure provides the bandwidth to support the most demanding technology, delivering high-resolution imaging across a hospital in moments, while keeping patients and staff wirelessly connected, and medical records secure.

Not investing in physical infrastructure, may mean not getting the best from the wireless technologies that help deliver competitive patient care. Here are four use cases.

Fast and efficient data collection

Wirelessly connecting medical devices to Electronic Health Records systems has reduced the time it takes to enter vitals from 7-10 minutes to less than 1 minute per patient, according to Becker’s Hospital Review**. What’s more, having access to up-to-date test results and medical records electronically enables staff to provide more streamlined care.

Reducing errors

With the help of wireless technology, patient information no longer has to be interpreted and uploaded to a hospital database manually, significantly reducing the risk of errors.

Location tracking

Wireless technology offers the ability to track a patient’s location, providing a sense of freedom and security for those with long-term illness living outside a medical facility. For example, if a patient with Alzheimer’s diseases goes missing, they can be easily located.

It also provides better care in medical facilities. Wireless, wearable sensors track patient movement, alerting nursing staff when someone leaves their room or suffers a fall.

Remote monitoring

Wireless smart devices allow doctors to monitor patients remotely. Medical devices such as vital sign monitors and infusion pumps transmit data to electronic records, giving doctors remote access to critical information. What’s more, doctors can provide patients with advice via video conferencing.

These examples simply scratch the surface of what’s possible with wireless technology powered by high-performance cabling. Our solutions can serve as the backbone for platforms that improve the quality of care today and beyond.

Discover how Elmhurst Memorial Healthcare relied on Panduit’s Enterprise and Data Center Solutions to create a home for high-level medical services to grow and thrive. Learn more now.

https://www2.deloitte.com/us/en/pages/life-sciences-and-health-care/articles/us-and-global-health-care-industry-trends-outlook.html

**  https://www.beckershospitalreview.com/healthcare-information-technology/the-connected-hospital-wireless-technology-shapes-the-future-of-healthcare.html