Panduit Innovation Recognized with 2019 ANSYS Hall of Fame Award

Panduit is built on a foundation of innovation, and our unwavering commitment to excellence in product design and performance was recently recognized with a Best in Show, Commercial category, in the 10th annual ANSYS 2019 Hall of Fame competition.

ANSYS, a global leader in engineering simulation software, conducts the Hall of Fame competition to highlight how engineers are solving key challenges with ANSYS Pervasive Engineering Simulation solutions across numerous industries. Panduit was one of three companies recognized in the Commercial category.

Panduit’s winning entry showcased how Panduit engineers optimized the design of high voltage cable cleat products to prevent the substantial damage that can occur before circuit breakers react to a short. The entry also highlighted how Panduit achieved significant cost and time savings for its latest line of cable cleat products.

View the video to learn more about our simulation testing model for innovative Panduit cable cleats.

Advanced R&D Solutions for Product Design

Cable cleats are needed to restrain high voltage cables during short circuit events. Current levels in these events can range upwards of 200,000 Amps. In the worst case of a 3-phase short, magnetic field induced repulsive forces between the cables can range upwards of 10,000 pounds and develop within 1/100th of a second. Substantial damage can occur before circuit breakers can react to the short. Cable restraint is critical to protecting personnel and infrastructure as well as reducing downtime.

Using state-of-the-art simulation software, Panduit’s engineers modeled this highly dynamic, multi-body contact, 3-phase alternating current short circuit test event that occurs over a period of 1/10th second (ref: IEC 61914:2015), can develop component velocities of more than 2000 inches/second, and exhibit high material deformation and catastrophic failure. Significant simulation development milestones included:

  1. Adjusting the stiffness, yield strength, and mass of solid copper conductors to behave like stranded conductors at the prevailing temperatures
  2. Developing high strain-rate material models for each component
  3. Integrating the electro-magnetic solution capability into the simulation
  4. Development of a 30-variable mathematical model to exactly match the short circuit test current pattern and using a genetic algorithm to find the variable coefficients
  5. Developing element erosion criteria to enable simulation of physical failure
  6. Successful verification in early testing

The new cable cleat product lines were originally certified in testing very near the peak short circuit current levels predicted by the simulation. The understanding of the variables involved in the 3-phase short circuit event and repeated simulations to verify design changes and predict peak current certification levels in testing resulted in a substantial reduction in the prototype-and-test cycle.

To find out more about Panduit’s legacy of innovation and our future-forward network and industrial electrical infrastructure technologies, visit our research and development section on panduit.com.

Having Cable Cleats Now Helps Prevent Re-Work Later

Cable cleats are like home or automobile insurance – you hope you never need to rely on them. And like insurance, cable cleats are an investment worth having. Too often the decision makers involved with industrial infrastructure projects choose to weigh this risk incorrectly, focusing on their bottom line instead of the costly rework a short circuit event without cable cleats can cause.

Future-proofing is a popular subject in the EPC community, but usually the use of cable cleats is not associated with being an effective way to future proof projects in harsh industrial environments. When contractors follow cable manufacturers recommendations and utilize cable cleats accordingly, an opportunity exists to avoid costly disasters that set projects back for years. Instead of taking a risk that can result in costly re-work – the replacement of cables, additional labor time, the cost of operational downtime – EPCs can leverage cable cleats as an effort to prevent these devastating incidents from occurring.

Short circuit events are particularly prevalent in the harsh environments that cable cleats are built and designed for. While it’s become a popular exercise for projects to attach cables to an aluminum rung and aluminum cable tray, what can be overlooked is that these cables are typically copper with steel padding, meaning that once they are affixed and the temperatures change, warping occurs, and short circuit events ensue. This results in an initial explosion, an ensuing catastrophic explosion, and cables being forced from their tray and into unpredictable directions to cause damage to materials, personnel, and anything else in between. This can put any project behind schedule for years, not to mention inflate its cost and leave behind a shaken workforce. Time doesn’t discriminate against this happening in any stage of a project’s lifecycle, but Panduit has built solutions that can accommodate this expected and typical thermal expansion.

Panduit cable cleat products for short circuit protection are designed to perform in a wide range of harsh environments, including industries like Oil and Gas, Power Generation, Mining, and Shipbuilding. Not to mention, they adhere to IEC 61914, the international standard that will soon harmonize with the go-to U.S. NEC standards. Panduit recommends the use of its cable cleat offerings – stainless steel locking tie cleats, stainless steel strap cleats, and clamp-style cable cleats – for many reasons, but one way they benefit EPCs is through their ability to allow for future proofing by preventing short circuit events from ever occurring and costly rework ever being needed.
For example, to prevent damage to cables and mounting brackets to secure the tie to various styles of ladder rack, stainless steel locking tie cleats should be leveraged. Suited for lower to medium peak short circuit current requirements, these cleats have a reduced installation time because they are installed using a manual or battery-operated installation tool.

Also featuring a polyurethane cushion sleeve to prevent damage to cable and mounting brackets to secure the strap to various styles of ladder rack are stainless steel strap cleats. A manually-operated installation tool makes their installation quick and they are suited for a broad range of peak short circuit current requirements, including some of the higher peak kA requirements.

A widely used cleat solution, clamp-style cable cleats are also suited for a broad range of peak short circuit current requirements and are the most durable for high peak kA requirements.

Cable cleats aren’t currently top of mind when it comes to developing industrial infrastructure projects, but they certainly should be. They are a crucial barrier to minimizing disruption and damage to personnel and property, and they allow EPCs peace of mind.

DCIM for Small Data Centers

When it comes to running an efficient operation, small data centers have many of the same concerns and challenges as their larger counterparts. One of the greatest challenges that managers of small data centers have is that they typically have limited resources in terms of technology, staffing, and financial support.

This can leave a small data center more vulnerable to inefficiencies, inflexibility for growth, and the potential for system failures. One example we run into on a regular basis occurs when the manager of a legacy data center needs to obtain power consumption and environmental data as a result of a cost reduction initiative, or difficulty finding capacity for new applications. This typically occurs in data centers that are older, may have between 20 and 30 racks, and have grown, despite best intentions, in unintended ways.

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Energy Boom Boosts Shipbuilding Construction

Check out this great blog citing the Wall Street Journal from The Center for Environment, Commerce & Energy on how shipping operators are pouring billions of dollars into the construction of oceangoing crude-oil carriers.

No matter where your shipbuilding operations reside – Panduit is there.
See how Panduit enables shipbuilders to address unique infrastructure challenges.

Panduit Shipbuilding Map

Importance of Lockout/Tagout

Lockout/Tagout is a process to control energy hazards for preventing accidental start-up or release of stored energy during set-up, maintenance and servicing of equipment. OSHA outlines this safety method in standard 29 CFR 1910.147 (“Control of Hazardous Energy”). Lockout/Tagout is a widely accepted practice for companies in the United States.   OSHA advises US companies, “Workers servicing or maintaining machines or equipment may be seriously injured or killed if hazardous energy is not properly controlled. Injuries resulting from the failure to control hazardous energy during maintenance activities can be serious or fatal! Injuries may include electrocution, burns, crushing, cutting, lacerating, amputating, or fracturing body parts, and others….Craft workers, electricians, machine operators, and laborers are among the 3 million workers who service equipment routinely and face the greatest risk of injury. Workers injured on the job from exposure to hazardous energy lose an average of 24 workdays for recuperation.” Here are 3 examples of accidents due to a lack of Lockout/Tagout practices:

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Cisco Live 2014

This year’s Cisco Live , being held at the Moscone Center in San Francisco, promises to be another exciting event. As a Platinum Sponsor, Panduit will be exhibiting in booth #1521 and will be featuring our Intelligent Data Center Solutions, Enterprise Solutions and Industrial Automation Solutions.

We are particularly excited about Cisco’s Application Centric Infrastructure (ACI) architecture that promises to deliver fast application provisioning and simplified operations. ACI networks will be built upon a flatter 2 tier network architecture that requires some new ways of thinking about how an optimal physical infrastructure should be built. Panduit has been working with Cisco to understand the differences between traditional three tier physical architectures and the ACI architecture, and will be presenting the “ACI Impact on Physical Infrastructure Design and Deployment” in the general session on Tuesday May, 20th at 2:00 p.m. PDT. Examples of cabinets configured with Spine/Leaf network topologies including Top of Rack (ToR), End of Rack (EoR) and Middle of Rack (MoR).

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Rescue Stranded Data Center Capacity

Whether it is power, space, or cooling, stranded capacity can strangle your data center’s efficiency, blow-up your budget and put the brakes on new applications implementation.  We have encountered many approaches to freeing stranded capacity ranging from the expensive…redeployment or reconfiguration of devices, or adding power or cooling capacity in an operational data center, to the ones requiring lower investment…additional perforated floor tiles, fans, or “meat locker” curtains to help improve cooling capacity utilization.

Frequently, we are asked to help reclaim stranded data center capacity. One approach that is relatively low risk and economical is to improve the utilization of existing cooling capacity. Installing blanking panels and sealing gaps in the raised floor is typically our first recommendation. Fast, simple, and inexpensive to implement, it is typically a first step and may not provide the level of separation needed to concentrate cooling air to accommodate higher densities. The next step is hot or cold aisle containment.

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Measure, Improve and Maintain for Higher Efficiency

Statistics, multiple analysts, and research reports indicate that data centers are often overprovisioned with power and cooling capacity to maintain service levels regardless of actual IT equipment utilization. As you are well aware, this approach has proven to be expensive and inefficient. As data center energy consumption grows it is drawing the attention of CFO’s and corporate responsibility managers who are concerned with the impact of the data center’s operation on the environment and of course, the impact on the bottom line. So how can you improve your data center’s efficiency?

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Maintaining Energy Efficiency

New research information from Data Center Dynamics indicates that global data center energy consumption in 2013 has slowed down to 7% growth as compared to 19% between 2011 and 2012. This reduction is attributed to energy efficiency measures, consolidation projects and outsourcing, primarily in mature markets.

Data Center Dynamics Graphic

So, does this mean data center managers and operators can breathe a sigh of relief? Not necessarily. Once energy efficiency improvement goals have been attained, how do you maintain that level of efficiency over the lifecycle of your data center?

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Living in a Material World: How to Select Solar Power Cable Management

Solar ImageMaterial selection is critical to designing and building a photovoltaic (PV) solar plant that will last 15-25 years. If you identify the proper design requirements and obtain the best materials for cable management, you can build a system that meets your expectations and reduces the total cost of ownership of your plant.

Issues you need to consider when building a PV solar plant are temperature, ultraviolet (UV), abrasion and chemical reactions as part of your design and product selection to enable the commissioning and operation of a solar plant to finish on time, require lower maintenance cost and increase your overall return on investment.

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