Standards Update: 28 AWG, MPTL Now Compliant!

When Panduit introduced 28 AWG patch cords to the market in 2011, we knew we were on to something big. When we showed customers and contractors the skinny patch cords, they were amazed by the sheer size and flexibility of the cords. At the time, they might not have fully realized the impact the cords could have in overcrowded telco rooms, but nonetheless, they were impressed.

28 AWG Patch CordsHowever, while the cords met all the performance requirements of the copper cabling standards (with reduced channel lengths), they didn’t meet the wire gauge requirements of the standard, which required 22-26 AWG wires. Hence the 28 AWG patch cords were not fully standards compliant. Because of the huge size advantages and minimum channel length reductions, most Panduit customers adopted the 28 AWG cords. However, even after 7 years on the market, some customers remain hesitant or flat out refuse to try them, as they want a solution that is fully standards-compliant.

Compliance Achieved!

Today, Panduit is excited to be able to say that 28 AWG patch cords are FULLY COMPLIANT with copper cabling standards. ANSI/TIA-568.2-D, the Balanced Twisted-Pair Telecommunications Cabling and Components Standard, has been revised to include 28 AWG patch cords. The revised standard is expected to be published this month.

The revision was developed by the TIA TR-42.7 Copper Cabling Systems Subcommittee, which I’m a member of. The effort to get 28 AWG included wasn’t a small feat. In fact, this represents the culmination of two years of work by a broad spectrum of companies and individuals. During our discussions, it was apparent the committee members see the value the small cords bring. As more and more building systems are networked, space in TRs is at a premium. Everyone is looking for ways they can squeeze more into their space and 28 AWG is an easy, inexpensive way to help make that happen.

At Panduit, we’ve been beating this drum for a while now. We’ve seen firsthand the impact 28 AWG cords have made in TRs. We’ve heard from customers how they have been able to add devices but keep the same pathways because of the reduced size. We have contractors telling us how the smaller size and flexibility have simplified moves, adds, and changes. And, we’ve seen other manufacturers jump on the bandwagon. In short, the industry has embraced 28 AWG patch cords.

Modular Plug Terminated Links Added to Standard Also

Along with the addition of 28 AWG patch cords, the revised standard also recognizes modular plug terminated links (MPTLs). MPTLs are essentially permanent links that have field terminated plugs on one end, instead of a typical jack-to-jack permanent link. Although installers have used this method for years, a new breed of MPTL plugs have entered the market, including Panduit’s new Field Terminated Plug. These plugs are designed specifically for connecting the growing number of networked devices that are going into buildings. The standard revision allows for field testing of MPTLs – something that hasn’t been possible previously. With field testing using a recognized and reputable tester, the installer can be assured that the channel that includes the MPTL meets applicable Category 5e, 6 or 6A performance requirements to support data rates of 1G and higher.

MPTLs are a key component in today’s digital building, allowing quick and easy connections for cameras, access points, lights and more. As additional systems are added to the network, MPTL use will continue to grow. The addition of this new connector to the standard solidifies the continued use of MPTLs going forward.

If standards compliance is an issue for your organization, now’s your chance to try these connectivity solutions in your buildings and see the big difference yourself. Reach out to your distributor or your Panduit account manager to see these in person if you haven’t already.

Top 6 Things to Know About the New Category 8 Cabling Standard

The Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA) has published ANSI/TIA-568-C.2-1, which supports 25, 40 and possibly even 50GBASE-T over Category 8 copper cabling. As you consider high-bandwidth applications, here are some key things to keep in mind.

1) How far can you go?

Category 8 channel reach is 30 meters, much shorter than the 100-meter channel of traditional categories of copper cabling.

2) It’s a familiar face!

Category 8 has the familiar RJ45 interface, so jacks and plugs are compatible with the same patch panels, switches, and other equipment that users are familiar with today.

Category 8 products

Category 8 will be deployed as shielded twisted pair construction only.

3) Shields up!

While other category cabling uses unshielded or shielded twisted pair construction, Category 8 will only be shielded cable construction.

4) Where, oh where can it be?

Category 8 is designed for the data center. More specifically, it is designed to support 25G and 40GBASE-T switch-to-server links, a typical fiber-optic application. It will provide the most cost-effective and easiest-to-deploy 25G and 40G links within the data center. The 30-meter reach makes it challenging for Category 8 to be used to deliver higher bandwidth to the desktop or in other Enterprise applications in large-scale deployments.

5) Can Enterprise play, too?

Due to the reach limits of Category 8, Panduit recommends installing Category 6A today for all Enterprise applications. Category 6A supports up to 10GBASE-T at lengths up to 100 meters. Investing in a Category 6A infrastructure for your Enterprise space is the smartest and most cost-effective option for long-term optimal performance of your network. Panduit’s Advanced MaTriX Category 6A products have the additional advantage of allowing optimal heat dissipation and performance with next-generation Power over Ethernet (PoE++).

6) The next step …

Manufacturers are actively developing the next generation 25G and 40G products. Panduit expects to have its product offering – including cabling and connectivity – in 2017, to coincide with the launch of active equipment that will require the higher speeds.

Panduit has already received third-party approval on it’s upcoming Category 8 solution. Learn more here.