Why Is My Cable Pathway Upside Down?

Upside Down Design Can Keep Your Installation Costs Right Side Up

 

One of the most common questions asked about the Wyr-Grid Overhead Cable Pathway System is “why is it upside down?”

WG30BL

The Wyr-Grid tray is “upside down” because the design is based on a strong wire mesh platform reinforced with 1-1/2” high wire mesh walls that are oriented downward giving the appearance of an up-side down wire mesh tray. While appearing unconventional, this design combines the best attributes of cable runway with the flexibility and utility of wire mesh pathways.

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Cabinets Are More Than Big Metal Boxes

How do cabinets impact operational costs?

This question is not asked enough by data center designers, owners or managers as they build-out new whitespace. Cabinets are the foundation of the data center’s physical infrastructure, used throughout the life cycle of the facility. IT equipment that runs the applications are contained within them, the cabling that connects the equipment to the users and the LAN/SANs are terminated and managed in them, power is distributed within them, and cooling is channeled through them. They are also the most visible infrastructure element, and how they look and fit together is often an indicator of how a data center is run and managed.

Why then are they frequently taken for granted, simply considered “big metal boxes”? Why isn’t there more emphasis on cabinets being considered an asset that helps reduce operational costs?

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Adding a New Physical Infrastructure: Part 1

How do you build out a new data center physical infrastructure?

Under the best of circumstances, building out new data center capacity is complex, expensive, time consuming and fraught with risk. Experts, engineers and consultants are needed for everything from designing the building shell, planning power and cooling systems, to commissioning. These are just the major categories. Think about the expertise needed to manage all the details that cascade from them!

If you are responsible for a small to mid-sized data center you may be faced with doing more of this yourself given the available resources. Increased complexity makes it difficult to find and retain people who possess all the essential skills needed to design and integrate the power, cooling, racks, cabling and other components necessary to complete the build correctly, and on-time. Taking on the coordination of the build-out in addition to normal responsibilities can be overwhelming.

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Short Circuit Faults – Are You Protected?

When running power cable through a facility using a ladder rack, the design considerations on how to affix the cables to the ladder arise. Options such as nylon cable ties, stainless strapping, cable cleats, tie wire and, believe it or not, even doing nothing at all, are all practices that have been witnessed in the field. In addition to cable management, engineering firms must also consider the implications of a short circuit fault as part of the design process. When a short circuit fault occurs, tremendous magnetic forces repel the power cables from each other resulting in violent forces that damage everything in their path.

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Selecting the Right Pathway for Your TR

Telecommunication rooms (TR) have long been used as critical consolidation points between backbone and horizontal cabling. Today, increasing lifecycle demands on modern facilities require architects, engineers, and contractors to provide facilities that adapt to the changing demands that building owners and IT personnel will require over the lifecycle of the building. Besides providing the critical function of holding telecommunications equipment, cross connect cables, and connectivity for areas of the building served by that TR, modern building automation (BAS) and security systems place evolving demands on the TR infrastructure. Much emphasis is directed toward the specification of equipment, cable connectivity, and cable management within equipment racks, but the selection of optimal cable routing and pathway solutions is typically given much less consideration.

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Living in a Material World: How to Select Solar Power Cable Management

Solar ImageMaterial selection is critical to designing and building a photovoltaic (PV) solar plant that will last 15-25 years. If you identify the proper design requirements and obtain the best materials for cable management, you can build a system that meets your expectations and reduces the total cost of ownership of your plant.

Issues you need to consider when building a PV solar plant are temperature, ultraviolet (UV), abrasion and chemical reactions as part of your design and product selection to enable the commissioning and operation of a solar plant to finish on time, require lower maintenance cost and increase your overall return on investment.

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