New NFPA 70E Labeling Requirements

The NFPA 70E Standard provides guidelines for electrical safety in the workplace. Recently this standard has been updated to provide consistency of terms with other standards that address hazards and risk.

Some of these changes introduced new terms such as arc flash risk assessment to replace arc flash analysis and shock risk assessment to replace shock hazard analysis.

Determining the Arc Flash Risk Assessment and Shock Risk Assessment for electrical devices provides important information to warn of the specific risks associated with an energized piece of equipment. This information is communicated to workers through the use of equipment labels.

In Section 130.5(D) of the 2015 NFPA 70E Standard new requirements for Arc Flash Warning Labels are explained.

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Safety in the Workplace

Recently we had the opportunity to guest write on Thorne and Derrick’s blog.  Below is what we published on the topic of Safety in the Workplace!

You may ask yourself why you need a safety services program in your organization?

It’s expensive, I need additional staff, and we haven’t had an incident yet…YET is the key word! It’s time to start being proactive instead of reactive! In addition to the numerous industry-wide standards for hazardous energy, electrical safety and environmental standards, the safety of your workplace and personnel should be a top of mind concern.

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Importance of Lockout/Tagout

Lockout/Tagout is a process to control energy hazards for preventing accidental start-up or release of stored energy during set-up, maintenance and servicing of equipment. OSHA outlines this safety method in standard 29 CFR 1910.147 (“Control of Hazardous Energy”). Lockout/Tagout is a widely accepted practice for companies in the United States.   OSHA advises US companies, “Workers servicing or maintaining machines or equipment may be seriously injured or killed if hazardous energy is not properly controlled. Injuries resulting from the failure to control hazardous energy during maintenance activities can be serious or fatal! Injuries may include electrocution, burns, crushing, cutting, lacerating, amputating, or fracturing body parts, and others….Craft workers, electricians, machine operators, and laborers are among the 3 million workers who service equipment routinely and face the greatest risk of injury. Workers injured on the job from exposure to hazardous energy lose an average of 24 workdays for recuperation.” Here are 3 examples of accidents due to a lack of Lockout/Tagout practices:

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