The Roadmap to Your HDV Success: What Standard You Need to Know for Wire Systems in 2019

As with many industries, the heavy-duty vehicle industry faces challenges with evolving safety standards and certification requirements. Many of these requirements may come from governments or regulatory agencies or may be more informal yet voluntary standards adopted by the industry. Staying familiar with these ever-changing regulations can be a daunting task, especially when factoring in regional or country-specific nuances.   

Every component you are designing into a product likely also has a required certification or standard that your product needs to be in compliance with. For instance, whether you are designing to transport people or goods, a heavy-duty vehicle will have a complex electrical wiring system. The electrical connectors and wiring materials you design into that system are critical, with the need to withstand dirt, debris, high heat, extreme cold, friction, corrosion and rigidity. Exposure to one of these elements and even the slightest damage to a small electrical component can cause havoc on the entire system.

With more than 50 years of proven experience in wire harness and heavy duty cable management, we know that designing with the right materials can mean the difference between meeting your complex specifications and regulatory requirements – or not. It is why we work so hard to push for standardization – not only to improve upon our own excellence, but to give the entire industry a benchmark upon which they can deliver quality products resulting in higher customer satisfaction, while improving their own productivity and profitability.

That is why changes happening this year are significant for those designing heavy-duty vehicles: the new ANSI UL 62275 publication has harmonized with CSA C22.2 No. 62275 (Canada), NMX-J-623-ANCE (Mexico) and IEC 62275 (Europe), establishing a standard type classification and performance ratings for plastic cable ties, mounts, metallic cable ties, and integral cable tie mounts.

Major changes include:

  1. A requirement of parallel entry metallic cable ties to be tested with the locking mechanism positioned at 9:00, whereas testing may have been conducted previously at 12:00.
  2. Coated metallic cable ties are currently classified as Type 21 products but will be classified as Type 2 under ANSI UL 62275.
  3. The contribution to fire test will now be needed to classify coated metallic cable ties as Type 2.
  4. Products classified as outdoor use products will be required to run the environmental exposure test at a spectral irradiance of 0.51, with the previous irradiance value being 0.35.
  5. Testing under ANSI UL 62275 will include tensile strength, minimum operating temperature, minimum installation temperature, minimum and maximum bundle diameter, UV resistance, vibration for metallic cable ties-cycling, corrosion, contribution to fire-needle flame, and plenum.

So what does this mean exactly?

The UL 62275 standard will be critical for the heavy-duty vehicles industry going because it ensures an increase in quality and safety. It also cuts down on the number of products to be tested, reducing the time, money and paperwork needed to ensure certification or compliance. Without harmonization, an OEM may be required to use different wire harness products based on a heavy-duty vehicle’s ultimate destination, taking up time and putting more pressure on workers to complete tests for each regional standard.

Instead, OEMs may now have more time for R&D to further advance their designs to better serve the end-user. Not only will this provide customers with better products, but will encourage a whole new host of innovation within the heavy-duty vehicle sector.

To get more insight into UL 622275, read our white paper Prepare for the Future: What Global Standards Harmonization Will Mean for the Wire Harness Industry.


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Five OSHA Regulation Changes That Could Impact Your Facility This Year

Hardhats in a row at a job site.
OSHA’s $5 million budget increase could suggest an increase in regulatory actions, inspections, and citations, as the organization has regulatory changes in store for the year ahead.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) fiscal year 2019 budget, according to Industrial Safety and Hygiene News, increased by $5 million over 2018 to reach a $557.8 million total. This increase could suggest an increase in regulatory actions, inspections, and citations, as the organization has regulatory changes in store for the year ahead. While these safety regulation updates and additions are spread across several industries, here are five that workers and facilities should be prepared for.

IEEE 1584-2018

Published just before December of last year, this Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers guide for performing arc flash hazard calculations was significantly updated from IEEE 1584-2002.

Related to the method for calculating the arc flash hazard distance and the incident energy to which employees could be exposed during work on or near electrical equipment, designers and facility operators in facilities where live work is performed on electrical equipment need to become especially familiar with this change. With arc flash hazard calculations being implemented in most plants because of OSHA regulations, this new model accurately accounts for a wide variety of setup parameters.

Employers should be sure to confirm that an arc flash risk assessment has been done within the last five years. Calculations are most often listed on arc flash and equipment labels and are used as part of an arc flash risk assessment. Updates to labels to reflect new calculation requirements may be necessary depending on the results of the arc flash assessment.

Increased Fines

To adjust for inflation, and as required by the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act Improvements Act of 2015, OSHA has increased the maximum civil penalties on employers cited for safety violations. The annual penalty increases are required by the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act Improvements Act of 2015 (ACT) and apply to Federal OSHA states. Information on the change can be found here.

Random Inspection

Late last year OSHA announced it would implement its Site Specific Targeting 2016 inspection plan, which applies to non-construction workplaces with more than 20 employees. Employers who failed to provide 2016 Form 300A data to OSHA will be selected at random and added to an inspection list combined with employers who reported high rates of days away, restricted, or transfer in 2016. OSHA will include a random sample of employers with low rates to the list. The collected data will be used to create inspection lists.

Drone Inspection

Midway through 2018 OSHA began gradually implementing a new policy of inspecting workplace inspections utilizing drones. The organization issued a memo authorizing compliance officers to inspect areas that are inaccessible or pose a safety risk, with 2019 being the first full year of this practice being implemented. Compliance officers must obtain consent from an employer and notice must be provided to employees before the drone is launched.

Tracking of Workplace Injuries and Illnesses

For workplaces with 250 or more employees, OSHA now only requires an electronic submission of OSHA Form 300A. Facilities should continue to record workplace injuries and illnesses and follow reporting requirements, but OSHA amended its record-keeping regulation to remove the requirement to electronically submit information from OSHA Form 300 (log of work-related injuries and illnesses) and OSHA Form 301 (injury and illness incident report). However, the requirement to keep and maintain OSHA Forms 300, 300A, and 301 for five years is not changed.

Keeping up with regulations and requirements is key to avoiding shut downs and lost business costs. By implementing policies, holding staff accountable, and staying abreast of safety regulations you can positively contribute to your business’ bottom line. For more tips on how to optimize safety practices in your facility, read our white paper Six Keys to Managing Workplace Electrical Safety.

Physical Security is First Line of Defense Against Network and Equipment Threats

Former student destroys 59 university computers using USB Killer device. This was the latest headline in tech magazines about damage to computer equipment, caused by someone gaining access to an open port on equipment. This incident cost The College of Saint Rose in New York nearly $60,000 in equipment and the labor to replace. Whether it is destroyed equipment or data breaches, open ports on equipment are costly for institutions of all shapes and sizes.

Fortunately, it is easy – and inexpensive – to prevent these types of activities.

Physical security is easy to overlook when IT departments look at information security, but it is often the easiest and best place to start, forming a first line of defense against malicious activity. Access control measures, including locked doors on server rooms and telecommunication closets, and even locked cabinets or tamper resistant faceplates are a great place to start. However, that won’t stop a disgruntled employee – or student, in the example article above – from doing significant damage to computers, monitors, or any device that has an open port.

A simple fix is to block those ports to anyone who shouldn’t have access. Because many peripheral devices connect to computers via USB drives (think headsets, printers, wireless mouse, and more), virtually every computer has at least one USB port. When those ports aren’t in use, especially on equipment that is easy for many people to access, a USB block-out blocks the port and can’t be removed without a removal key. This solution costs just a few dollars per port, and prevents incidents like the headline above, where the student used a “USB Killer” device to render thousands of dollars’ worth of equipment unusable. Similar to a lock on a door, it may not keep every thief out, but will encourage most of them to move on and look for an easier target elsewhere.

USB ports aren’t the only ports that can be protected. Panduit offers block-out devices for USB ports, RJ45 copper jacks, and LC duplex fiber adapters, and lock-in devices to secure patch cords or plugs in RJ45 jacks.

Learn more about Panduit’s physical security solution in our Network Infrastructure Security Solution brochure.

And, be on the lookout for a new USB block-out that will be hitting shelves soon, with a smaller form factor that sits flush with the device, making it ideal for laptops and other applications.

How to Select the Right Cable Cleat

Choosing the correct cable cleat to protect your project will assure optimal performance, reliability, and quality. Panduit has solutions to suit a variety of environmental conditions, industrial applications, and short circuit fault current requirements.

Having the right cable cleat provides restraint and protection in the event of a short circuit fault. Panduit has developed the Cleat kAlculator™ to help engineers, designers, and installers determine the correct cable cleat for their application.

To simplify this selection decision, three easy steps allow users to:
  1. Select a cable layout
  2. Input cable outer diameter
  3. Input peak short circuit current

The Cleat kAlculator™ is available for download in the Apple Store
or Google Play.

When Selecting Cable Cleats, Consider a Variety of Factors

Cable Layout: How the cables are arranged and secured will determine which cable cleat fits them best.

Cable Outer Diameter: The diameter of the cable determines what the correct size of cleat is and is also required for calculating the short circuit forces the cleat could face.

Peak Short Circuit Current Rating in kA

Cable Tray Rung Design and Spacing

Environment Performance: The cable cleat should have the material and specification features needed for it to withstand the elements it will face. Examples include flame rating, extreme temperatures, or chemical and corrosion resistance.

Using this data, force between conductors during short circuit event can be calculated and the correct cleats at appropriate spacing can be determined. Cleat spacing is always a function of the peak kA, distance between the centers of neighboring conductors, and the rated strength of a cleat.

NEC 392.20(C) and The Cable Tray Institute provide guidelines for securing cable on horizontal and vertical runs, but cable cleat spacing is determined by the calculated forces during a short circuit fault. For horizontal, vertical and radius sections of the cable run, additional cable restraints beyond the minimum cable cleat requirements may be required for proper cable management. 

Panduit’s extensive line of cable cleat solutions provides various options to fit the needs of the project and provide job productivity, reliability, and safety. Panduit recommends the following solutions: stainless steel locking strap cleat, stainless steel buckle strap cleat, stainless steel trefoil cleat, and aluminum and polymer cleats. These cable cleats are designed to perform in a wide range of harsh environments, reduce material cost, and reduce installation time.

Lab tests performed on Panduit cable cleats verify strength of cleats and provide a baseline rating, in addition to being validated at a third-party test facility to ensure they perform to specifications when needed.

The simple and intuitive design leads to increased productivity, and they are compatible with a variety of ladder racks and cables.
To learn more about Panduit’s line of Cable Cleats and to download the The Cleat kAlculator™ visit Panduit.com/cablecleat

Short Circuit Events and the Havoc They Wreak on Infrastructure Projects

Why NEC 392.20(C) leaves you unprotected

There are many ways for a short circuit fault to develop, and they can happen anywhere along the electrical distribution system. Short circuit faults occur when an abnormal connection between two nodes of an electric circuit is made.

During a short circuit fault, maximum electromechanical stress between conductors occurs at or before 0.005 second. Current levels in these events can range upwards of 200 kA. In the worst case of a 3-phase short, magnetic field induced repulsive forces between the cables can range upwards of 10,000 pounds.

When a short circuit fault occurs, tremendous magnetic forces repel the power cables from each other resulting in violent forces that damage everything in their path. Typical circuit breakers and other protection devices trip and interrupt a fault between 0.06 to 0.1 second, leaving just enough time for substantial damage to occur.

Cable cleats reduce damage and rework by performing their function within those first 0.005 second (i.e. at peak kA) before a circuit breaker trips and interrupts a fault, making them the best option for short circuit mitigation.

Without the use of a cable cleat system, there is no protection for the employees or equipment in a facility when the short circuit forces are at their peak prior to a circuit interrupter engaging. To avoid potentially severe damage to the facility and infrastructure, as well as personal injury, cable cleats are used to restraint cables during short circuit events.

Cable tray systems provide more design flexibility and can be easier to install than traditional pipe and wire but must be properly engineered for protection against short circuit faults. Cable tray applications are only a safe and viable solution when paired with the right cable cleat.

Specifying and installing the right cable cleats when electrical infrastructure is first established is paramount to setting projects up for success. While metal conduit is often used in several areas of a project to distribute power, it is also often distributed by cables in a cable tray system.

In the U.S., NEC 392.20(C) is the National Electrical Code that governs the safety of the cable installations in cable tray. NEC Article 392.20(C) states: “Parallel connected single conductor cables shall be securely bound in circuit groups to prevent excessive movement due to fault current magnetic forces.”

While NEC 392.20(C) includes language for securing cables during a short circuit fault, it does not specify how to design the proper containment system to meet those forces. Often the lack of clear guidelines on short circuit protection in the NEC results in inadequate or no cable containment
to protect against short circuit events in tray cable installations. Europe has been utilizing cable tray systems for several decades and leads the industry in design standards and best practices.

As such, the IEC 61914:2015 standard provides the testing methodology and process to ensure reliability of cable cleats and ultimate protection in the event of a short circuit event. Cable in cable trays are only a safe and viable solution when paired with the right cable cleat solution to protect against short circuit events.

Unfortunately, NEC 392.20(C) does not currently provide specific guidance on how to securely contain cables in the event of a short circuit when routing cables in a cable tray. To protect the electrical infrastructure when using power cables in a tray, installing an IEC 61914:2015 compliant
cable cleat is the best option when protecting against a peak short circuit fault.


To learn more about Panduit Cable Cleats, visit www.panduit.com/cablecleat

Consolidation – The pros and cons of putting your eggs in one basket

Consolidating key facilities like data centers has obvious advantages. Chief amongst these are reduced costs, licensing, energy consumption, and maintenance.

But consolidating facilities also consolidates risk. If your single, major global data center goes down, then the company goes down with it.

So, how do you decide how to play a consolidated strategy, and put in place the correct procedures, policies, and technologies to mitigate risk?

Here are some quick pointers.

Designing a consolidated hub

Firstly, consolidating physical resources can cut your overhead, operational, and energy costs, so consider doing more with less hardware.

Software-based ‘server-less’ computing can help you consolidate onto fewer machines using cloud computing and technology such as virtualization and software-defined networking.

Consolidating software onto fewer hardware platforms can also reduce software licensing fees.

However, to pull off a move like this you will need to acquire the required expertise, or find a service provider who can design and manage your next-generation data center.

Mitigating risk through infrastructure design

Modern networking infrastructure design can help mitigate risk through techniques such as application orchestration and policy-based actions.

This model takes a bird’s eye view of your business software and services, and ensures everything runs smoothly, shifting resources where they’re needed in a timely way.

Underpinned by a modern network, this can be very effective in maintaining uptime, with cloud technologies such as ‘containerized micro-services’ offering self-managing, self-healing applications that run automatically, and scale up and down via the cloud.

All of this helps mitigate the risk of consolidation.

The downside is that, again, these cutting-edge technologies require technical know-how, investment, and a different approach to managing and monitoring your IT system.

Future-proofed technology

You want to make sure you have the necessary technology to ensure your new crown jewel data center won’t be rendered obsolete before the construction crew even breaks ground.

So, try to make sure you choose open-standards technologies with resources that can be re-purposed and extended without excessive development effort and cost.

Always-on infrastructure

Finally, how do you spec a data center for the always-on needs of a modern financial institution, that can guarantee near-constant uptime, and without breaking the bank?

When consolidating resources, you need to build in flexibility, and avoid technology silos by ensuring that your resources are transparent, networked, and shared.

Virtualization is a key element of a successful data center consolidation strategy, and it can help you achieve these things.

A converged network architecture that simplifies, accelerates, and utilizes resources, is also a must-have.

This could include fast, Fiber Channel or iSCSI networks to connect servers and storage, plus network and storage virtualization, which pools and optimizes your network and storage resources in a cost-effective and efficient way.

There are two major procedures for implementing change. Either rip and replace an old platform, particularly if it’s failing. Or develop the two side-by-side, transitioning applications step-by-step.

The latter may be more prudent for you, carrying less risk. Either way, as an experienced networking architecture partner, Panduit can help you plan and implement a next-generation network infrastructure.

Find out more at: https://pages.panduit.com/finance-all.html

Reduce Time Needed to Validate: How Quality Tooling for Wire Systems Help You Achieve HDV Production Volume Faster

OEM Design Engineers know better than anyone how long it can take to thoroughly validate a new component or product to drive business value. When quality lacks in a product and it fails testing, nothing is more frustrating than needing to find a replacement – one that is not only responsible to both the cost and innovation – but that is able to pass all the testing without holding up the larger development and production timelines.

The heavy-duty vehicle industry is especially prone to quality challenges. Building machinery for some of the most variable and complex environments often involves custom design, assembly and maintenance. Heavy-duty vehicles must be durable to withstand dirt, debris, high heat, extreme cold, friction, corrosion and rigidity. Exposure to these elements or even slight damage to small wire components can strain an entire system. It is for this reason that durable and dependable wire harness systems for heavy-duty vehicles, while often overlooked, can make a huge impact in not only ensuring on-time production, but a product’s success in the industry.

So, what type of wire harness solutions can you incorporate to ensure a smooth pathway to production?

  1. Heavy Duty Cable Ties promoting design flexibility through added tensile strength, heavy duty cable ties can withstand internal and external temperatures and exceed industry standards for use in high vibration areas. Additional improvements in reliability and productivity can also be found by increasing bundle diameter variations.
  2. Automatic Cable Tie Tool – automatic cable tie installation systems can maximize bundling productivity six times faster than manual cable tie methods. Our PAT 4.0 Automatic Cable Tie Installation System can attach 84 cable ties per minute, which is 25 percent faster than other automatic cable tie systems, helping to reduce user fatigue and improve tool maneuverability.
  3. Harness Board System components – incorporating grid tiles and repositionable accessories can greatly improve the productivity of wire harness assembly builds. Panduit’s Quick-Build™ Harness Board System components such as grid tiles, mounting pegs, mounting platforms and grid tile connectors can help reduce layout and board build material costs as much as 65 percent, while delivering more than 50 percent in storage space savings by reducing the number of required bulky plywood boards.

One OEM that successfully implemented wire system solutions to maintain its continued excellence in the road transportation market is Iveco, the world’s leader in industrial special vehicles like firefighting, off-road missions, the military, and civil defense. The company needed to update its wire assembly during a system redesign of its Eurocargo truck in order to comply with the Euro 6 standard, which designated the acceptable limits for exhaust emissions of newly registered road vehicles sold in Europe.

Iveco worked with Panduit to install a complete fastening solution including cable tie mounts, plastic and stainless steel cable ties, accessories, and installation tools. Specifically, Iveco anchored two cables alongside the engine muffler on approximately 13,000 trucks – equaling about four cable tie mounts per vehicle. The solution to anchor those cables can withstand high temperatures up to 392°F, is weather resistant and has passed select chemical resistance tests. Iveco then improved its assembly line efficiency by using the PAT 4.0 system for installation, giving workers the ability to be more agile and install the fastening solution more quickly. With more than 50 years of experience in wire harness, heavy duty cable management and control panel solutions, Panduit has supported heavy-duty vehicle OEMs worldwide through its global manufacturing, warehousing and diverse technical and sales support capabilities. To learn how you can design wire assembly and bundling to be more productive for your heavy duty vehicle application, read our new eBook.

New Lab Delivers Best Practices for AV Deployment

World Laboratory Day is observed on April 23 each year and the timing couldn’t be better to announce the opening of Panduit’s new Audio-Visual Lab. Panduit has a long history of providing superior category cabling solutions for enterprise applications. We are able to offer our customers the best infrastructure solutions for their networks, thanks to the breadth of our expertise. Customers can rely on Panduit as a trusted advisor covering all aspects from installation, testing, industry standards, network topologies, along with the performance and capabilities of the infrastructure deployed.

With the acquisition of Atlona a few months ago, Panduit can now be that trusted advisor for emerging audio visual (AV) applications that make their way onto ethernet networks. Combining Panduit’s existing expertise with Atlona’s AV expertise, we can now give our customers a unique end-to-end perspective covering all aspects of an AV solution. To realize the benefits of our combined expertise, we have built a new research lab at the Jack E. Caveney Innovation Center. The lab was developed with three key objectives:

  1. Leverage our expertise of infrastructure and networking in AV over IP applications using Atlona’s industry-leading OmniStream solution
  2. Create an environment to understand the best practices for configuration and deployment of Atlona hardware on ethernet networks
  3. Enable competitive testing of AV infrastructure as well as alternate networked AV solutions

From these objectives, we defined key areas of focus for various AV technologies and set about to develop a site with all the necessary equipment, infrastructure, and hardware needed for a world-class lab. 

For AV over IP applications, we will have the ability to explore aspects such as network topology, infrastructure, congestion, and redundancy. The lab will consist of a highly configurable network topology to emulate real world local area network (LAN), core campus, and wide area network (WAN) configurations. A diverse array of cabling infrastructure is being installed to allow networks to be connected with either Category 5e, 6, or 6A in unshielded or shielded applications. Each cabling option will also be available in worst case configurations covering maximum and minimum four connector channel lengths per Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA) guidelines. We will have the ability to evaluate the impact of network congestion on AV traffic when it is converging with other ethernet traffic such as email, voice, and web. For redundant network applications, we will be able to study the impact of various network failure modes on AV traffic. From this type of experimentation, we will be able to provide our customers with a detailed understanding of an AV network’s capabilities, along with recommendations and best practices for equipment configuration and infrastructure deployment.

Along with studying the various use cases of AV over IP and deployment options, the lab will have the ability to test other emerging Enterprise applications in the future. For this reason, the lab is known as EARL, or Enterprise Application Research Lab.

With the knowledge and insight gained from EARL, we can provide the best customer experience and guidance based on a cohesive Enterprise solution.

Earth Day 2019: Your Infrastructure can Help your Building Reduce its Environmental Impact

On Earth Day, environmental sustainability becomes a hot topic. But, the environmental impact of a building is around every day, and there are things you can do to lessen that environmental impact 24/7/365.

At Panduit, we do more than just talk about sustainability. Our world headquarters, which will celebrate its tenth birthday next year, is a LEED Gold Certified building and is just one example of our commitment to healthy, energy efficient, and sustainable business environments.

We can help you achieve that LEED certification as well. Panduit copper cable and jacks hold Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs) and Health Product Declarations (HPDs), which contribute points towards your building’s LEED certification.

A couple of years ago the US Green Building Council adopted LEED version 4, which allows cabling systems to be counted toward LEED points. In response, Panduit was the first manufacturer to offer both EPDs and HPDs on copper cabling and connectors.

If you’re thinking about LEED certification, here’s what you need to know to make sure your cabling infrastructure can help:

EPD and HPD defined

  • EPD = Environmental Product Declaration
  • HPD = Health Product Declaration

EPDs and HPDs are both issued by a third party after they verify reports supplied by the manufacturer. EPDs disclose potential environmental impacts of a product, while HPDs disclose what a product contains and how it impacts human and ecological health.

What products carry EPDs and HPDs

A wide variety of materials used in the construction of buildings carry these declarations. Panduit has EPDs and HPDs on 18 types of RJ45 jacks and 22 different copper cables. This offering includes:

  • Unshielded and shielded applications
  • Category 5e, Category 6, and Category 6A
  • Riser and plenum flame ratings

How EPDs and HPDs equal LEED points

LEED requires the installation of at least 20 different products that have third-party certification to qualify for one LEED point. These products must be from at least five different manufacturers. So, when you install at least four different certified products from Panduit, that counts as one portion of one point for EPD and one portion of a second point for HPD. Different levels of LEED certification require different numbers of points to qualify. Our alliance partner, General Cable, also offers EPDs and HPDs on their cabling solutions, so if you use a PanGen solution, it equals a second manufacturer toward the requirement to have five different manufacturers.

Not all cabling and connectors are equal

Panduit is one of a handful of cabling manufacturers that have EPDs and HPDs on copper cabling and RJ45 jacks. So, if you’re looking for an end-to-end solution that can help you earn LEED certification, Panduit is a great choice!

We’d be happy to share more information on our EPDs and HPDs. You can find links to our EPD and HPD documents bundled with each product. For instance, here are the EPD and HPD for our Category 6A, unshielded Mini-Com® jacks. You’ll find similar documentation for other products in our online catalog at www.panduit.com. Or, reach out to your sales rep or customer service for more information.

We like to help companies do their part to help sustain the environment, and not just on Earth Day!

Selecting the Right Cable Cleat has Never Been So Easy

Panduit launches new Cleat kAlculator App that helps design engineers select the correct cable cleat in three simple steps

Selecting the right cable cleat can be a time-consuming process since the key parameters in selecting a cable cleat are cable diameter and short circuit current rating is a complex mathematical equation. The turnaround time to provide a cable cleat recommendation based on these inputs can be lengthy often involving consultation with the cleat manufacturer.

Panduit is proud to introduce the Cleat kAlculator™ App developed for ease of computing and determining what cable cleat is correct for power distribution applications in Oil & Gas, Data Center, Rail Infrastructure,  Alternative Energy and anywhere power is distributed via tray cable.

Balaji Kandasamy, Director of Engineering at Panduit saw the need for this app in August 2018 and spent 20-30 hours per week to figure out the numerous calculations and algorithms to incorporate into an app available for iPhone and Android devices. “There was a problem that needed to be solved for engineers and this is where I came up with the idea to produce an app”.

The app has been built and coded to review thousands of cleat calculations that are available and ultimately recommends Cable Cleat Part Number and Cable Cleat Installation Spacing based on cable diameter and peak short circuit diameter.

The recommended solutions provide:

  1. Multiple Cleat Options
  2. Cleat installation spacing for IEC 61914:2015 Compliance
  3. Level 1 and Level 2 fault installation recommendations

After numerous hours of coding and building out the app, this revolutionary tool will aid engineers in specifing cleats for their projects. This won’t be the last thing you see from Kandasamy, “I have curiosity and love to learn about new things. This is what led to me to develop this app”. By the end of 2019, Panduit will introduce a desktop version to compliment the app.


To download the Cleat kAlculator app, visit: www.panduit.com/cablecleat,  Apple App Store, or Google Play