PANDUIT PRESENTS OPTICAL CONNECTIVITY PAPERS AT IWCS

Panduit participated at the 67th International Cable & Connectivity Symposium (IWCS) at the Rhode Island Convention Center, Providence, October 14-17, 2018. During the technical conference, Panduit contributed two presentations that summarized recent advancements made in the field of data center communications.

Asher Novick presents at Advances in Optical Connectivity session

Asher Novick, Optical Research Engineer

At the technical conference, Asher Novick, optical research engineer, on behalf of our Fiber Optics Research Group, presented two papers at the Advances in Optical Connectivity session and the Multimode Fiber session. Novick‘s first presentation, titled “Performance Improvement of Single Mode Signal Transmission in Multimode Fiber using Ultra Low Loss Connector,” described a collaborative work with Cailabs (http://www.cailabs.com/) to enable single mode transmission over multimode fiber. Our research shows that utilizing novel optical phase masks technology and Panduit’s Ultra Low Loss connector can enable transmission of single mode lasers over links longer than 300 meters with multiple connectors at data rates of 100 Gbps. This investigation enables the use of installed multimode infrastructure with single mode transceivers. This is important to cope with needs of higher data rates in data centers without replacing fiber infrastructure.

His second presentation, titled “Correlation OTDR for Accurate Measurements of Optical Length of Fiber Optic Cables under Diverse Environmental Temperatures,” presents a novel technique to characterize optical length of cables, which is critical to equalize latency in emerging Financial Technology applications such as algorithmic trading. This paper has already been invited to be presented in the 2018 / 2019 IWCS Webinar Series program.

“Enabled by our world-class fiber optics laboratory, these contributions summarize our most recent research on the current factors limiting the reaches of multimode fiber communication systems,” said Panduit’s Chief Technology Officer Brett Lane. “They demonstrate our longstanding commitment to connecting original research to meeting our customers most demanding challenges of tomorrow.”

Investing in the future: collective thinking in facility design






Future-proofing facilities while leveraging previous investments

A new generation of facilities are being designed and constructed around the globe. A key facility design challenge is ensuring the systems and infrastructure involved will not only deliver new advantage but also function seamlessly with (and add value to) the other parts of a company’s ecosystem, including legacy systems and existing capital projects. Old and new primary investments need to work together harmoniously to deliver a more productive and profitable future.

Future-Proofed Facility Design White Paper

READ THE WHITE PAPER: Why state-of-the-art facilities require state-of-the-art infrastructure

In this age of digital transformation, data underpins modern business, connectivity is key, and operational scaling is a fact of life. This is why corporate facilities in banking, finance, and any other sector are being conceived to take advantage of the opportunities offered by this new landscape. Getting the infrastructure right, the strongest underpinning, is crucial. Continuing with the banking example, companies such as HSBC, JP Morgan Chase, Crédit Suisse and CitiBank (or their outsourcing partners) are doing precisely that.

The data center, now evolving into next-gen digital infrastructure architecture, has provided the core of banking operations for generations. Today, such data centers are expected to work smarter and do more to process and store vastly increased volumes of data, globally, quicker than ever. They must be always available, with no delays.

As a result, global heads of facilities and real estate want assurances they are investing in the right technical infrastructure, maximizing the ability of the organization’s IT to, for instance, deploy workload in the right places, and deliver the right services to users and customers at the right time (and at the right price) – integrating with still-valuable legacy systems where necessary. This requires technology that is both reliable and flexible, based on global standards, as well as working with acknowledged leaders in the field.

At a basic level, it can mean tried-and-tested cabling – the strongest physical foundations – and ensuring an overall standards-based approach that is not only optimized for interoperability and performance but also addresses a multitude of other facilities (and cost) requirements, from energy efficiency to cooling optimization, even space considerations. By looking at the bigger picture and applying joined-up thinking when making technology choices that affect facility design, facilities and real estate leaders – in partnership with IT and procurement teams – can ensure both connectivity and investment protection. This, in turn, can have a real impact on the bottom line as infrastructure converges, data volumes increase exponentially, and the pace of business continues to speed up.

To find out more about how you can future-proof your facilities while leveraging previous investments, read our report, “Why State-of-the-art Facilities Require State-of-the-art Infrastructure.”

Building the next-gen data centre: global, connected, ready for business






With modern business defined by data and by connectivity, tomorrow’s data centre will bear little resemblance to today’s models.

What we currently think of as a data centre is being superseded by next-gen digital infrastructure architecture: global in scale and defined by the business services it delivers and the user/consumer requirements that it satisfies. According to a recent Gartner, Inc. report, infrastructure and operations people tasked with data centres will have to focus on “enabling rapid deployment of business services and deploying workloads to the right locations, for the right reasons, at the right price”.

These super-charged requirements, and that unstoppable focus on data, mean the most robust, reliable and flexible infrastructure – physical, electrical and network – will be paramount. Gartner also added that, by 2025, eighty percent of enterprises will have shut down their traditional data centre versus ten percent today. The key word is “traditional”.

With the rise of next-gen digital infrastructure architecture, workload placement becomes a critical driver of successful digital delivery. That, in turn, is underpinned by performance, availability, latency, scalability, and so on. Indeed, Gartner suggests an “ecosystem” is required to enable “scalable, agile infrastructures”.

What’s the best way to engage with this era of digital transformation, interconnect services, cloud, edge services and Internet of Things (IoT) if you’re planning or preparing to replace your data centre? The optimum digital infrastructure architecture (aka modern data centre) to meet requirements for the next five, ten or 15 years will, as ever, depend on each organisation’s priorities. There’s no simple answer. For some, a major step will be to ensure the strongest physical foundations including cabling, pathways and security. Many organisations will need an effective way to “bridge the gap” from old-world data centre and stacks into converged networks and infrastructure. At the same time, data centre infrastructure management tools can help improve energy efficiency and reduce costs. Perhaps a through line in all situations is ensuring the right connectivity solutions: to increase network throughput, reduce latency, improve agility, ensure scalability, and so on. That way, you’re not only ready for opportunities presented by the Internet of Things – you’ll be ready for the Internet of Everything.

To learn more about ensuring you have the right connectivity solutions at your core, read the report: https://pages.panduit.com/finance-all.html

Elmhurst Memorial Healthcare Uses Technology to Provide Superior Patient Care

A Robust Network Infrastructure Allows for Patient-Centered Care

A robust network infrastructure allows for patient-centered care.

 

The future is here – but not all hospitals have the infrastructure to embrace it. So, when Elmhurst Memorial Healthcare rebuilt with a commitment to patient-centered care, they turned to Panduit for network infrastructure and connectivity solutions.

Challenge

The hospital needed to design a future-forward backbone for its enterprise to accommodate the 178,000-square-foot, four-story main hospital and to connect:

  • physician offices
  • outpatient healthcare services
  • surgical suites
  • the medical office building (80,000 square foot)

Solution

To accomplish this task, Elmhurst Memorial Healthcare relied on Panduit’s enterprise and data center network infrastructure solutions to create a campus-wide network that places the most advanced equipment and techniques in the hands of top medical talent.

Panduit enabled:

  • On-site telecom rooms and data center
  • Fast and secure data transmission
  • Efficient Power over Ethernet
  • Reliable wireless capabilities

Panduit’s TX6A™ 10Gig copper and Opticom® fiber backbone ensure that the entire care team can securely view medical records and test results simultaneously, regardless of location.

In addition, Panduit’s cabinet and cable management products organize and protect critical equipment and cabling from environmental hazards such as dust, heat, and humidity. Panduit’s FiberRunner® cable management system enables customers to manage, organize, and properly route their cables, saving space and ensuring optimal network operation.

Result

With Panduit’s help, Elmhurst Memorial Healthcare now makes technology decisions based on medical and business needs, not infrastructure limitations.

See the infographic case study.

 

 

Digitizing History for Future Preservation with Data Center Solutions

How the Vatican Apostolic Library Preserved its Manuscript Collection

The Vatican Apostolic Library preserves its invaluable documents with the help of a robust, highly available network infrastructure.

Undergoing a massive data transfer process is not easy, but the Vatican Apostolic Library did just that. Panduit’s previous success in enhancing the connectivity and performance for the Vatican Apostolic Library’s main data center earned it the trust to help digitize and protect more than 80,000 priceless historical manuscripts.

Founded in 1451, the Vatican Apostolic Library’s collection includes precious material from as far back as Michelangelo and Galileo. To preserve the collection and continue to contribute to the worldwide sharing of knowledge, the 15th-century library decided to digitize its antiquated and increasingly delicate manuscripts.

To successfully complete this project, the library’s Belvedere Court building needed a more efficient data center infrastructure to support document storage. The library also needed solutions to address power and energy usage challenges, capacity constraints, environmental and connectivity issues, and security and access control requirements.

Adapting to the constraints of the ancient structure, Panduit developed a solution with security, storage, and power management.

The building now uses hot-aisle containment with hot/cold air separation inside the cabinets for improved airflow – delivering a power savings of nearly 30% compared to the previous system.

SmartZone solutions simplified the library’s network infrastructure, managing, and monitoring rack power distribution units and environmental sensors through a single IP address. For enhanced data center security, the gateways support access via intelligent handles on cabinets.

The Vatican Apostolic Library now has the capability to support the vast amount of data generated by the digitization project, ensuring high reliability and elevated transmission speed. Because of Panduit’s network, people around the world have online access to these invaluable treasures.

Read the full article here.

Which Optical Fiber Should You Use: OM4+ or OM5 Fiber?

Since the TIA ratified the specification for OM5, a wideband multimode optical fiber (WB-MMF), customers that are thinking about upgrading their existing infrastructure, or building out new, are asking a question: Should they deploy OM5 fiber?

I’ll get to the answer in a bit.  First, let’s talk about what OM5 is.

OM5 is essentially an OM4 fiber that has an additional bandwidth specification at 953nm.  Both OM4 and OM5 have bandwidths specified as 4,700MHz•km at 850nm, and OM5 has a bandwidth specification of 2,450MHz•km at 953nm.  OM4 does not have a bandwidth specified at 953nm.

OM5 was designed to be used with optical modules that employ Shortwave Wavelength Division Multiplexing (SWDM).  These new SWDM modules use four wavelengths that span from 850nm through 953nm, to implement 100Gbps links.

Each wavelength is modulated at 25Gbps and by multiplexing them together, one attains 100Gbps.  See figure 1.  Given what wavelengths are used in SWDM optical modules, it is easy to see why the OM5 standard was developed.

OM5 signature core fiber

OM5 was designed to be used with optical modules that employ Shortwave Wavelength Division Multiplexing

Figure 1 – Implementing SWDM

Back to the question.

You only need to consider using OM5 if you plan on deploying 100Gbps links using SWDM optical modules AND need to reach out past 100m.

The interest in using SWDM optical modules is that they allow deploying a 100Gbps link over duplex MMFs, rather than taking up eight parallel fibers required when using 100GBASE-SR4.  SWDM allows reusing the existing duplex fiber infrastructure.

However, there are many more ideal alternatives for deploying 100Gbps over duplex fibers, such as 100G BiDi, or using PAM4 modulation to achieve the higher data rate.

The other alternatives do not suffer from SWDM’s shortcomings, such as higher cost, higher operating temperatures, and the inability to support breakout applications.  If you still are thinking about using SWDM 100G optical modules, and the reach is under 100m, then one would be better off using standard OM3 or OM4, as it is less expensive than OM5.

If extended reach is needed, say for 40G BiDi, the better alternative to OM5 fiber would be our OM4 Signature Core MMF.  Our OM4 Signature Core MMF can reach out to 200m using 40G BiDi, while OM5 will only reach out to 150m, the same as OM4.

That is because at the wavelengths used by BiDi modules, OM5 fiber is no better than OM4.  In fact, OM4 Signature Core has outperformed standard OM5 fiber in several head-to-head competitions conducted at end-user sites.

If the decision is to use 100G SWDM modules AND you need to reach longer than 150m, the better fiber to use would be our OM5 Signature Core MMF.  Our OM5 Signature Core MMF uses the same reach-enhancing technology as our OM4 Signature Core, so you can take advantage of reaches greater than the standard by 20%.

For an in-depth explanation on how our OM4 Signature Core and OM5 Signature Core MMFs are able to achieve extended distances, please visit our Signature Core landing page, where you will find everything you need to know about Signature Core MMFs.

Better yet, view the recorded webinar, Where Do We Go From Here? A Fork in the Road for Multimode Fiber, presented by Robert Reid, our senior technical manager with our Data Center business unit.  In the webinar, not only does Robert talk about our Signature Core MMF, but also OM5, SWDM, and other topics surrounding multimode optical fiber and modules.

Finally, you can download our ebook for a comparison of the various fiber type.

Top 6 Things to Know About the New Category 8 Cabling Standard

The Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA) has published ANSI/TIA-568-C.2-1, which supports 25, 40 and possibly even 50GBASE-T over Category 8 copper cabling. As you consider high-bandwidth applications, here are some key things to keep in mind.

1) How far can you go?

Category 8 channel reach is 30 meters, much shorter than the 100-meter channel of traditional categories of copper cabling.

2) It’s a familiar face!

Category 8 has the familiar RJ45 interface, so jacks and plugs are compatible with the same patch panels, switches, and other equipment that users are familiar with today.

Category 8 products

Category 8 will be deployed as shielded twisted pair construction only.

3) Shields up!

While other category cabling uses unshielded or shielded twisted pair construction, Category 8 will only be shielded cable construction.

4) Where, oh where can it be?

Category 8 is designed for the data center. More specifically, it is designed to support 25G and 40GBASE-T switch-to-server links, a typical fiber-optic application. It will provide the most cost-effective and easiest-to-deploy 25G and 40G links within the data center. The 30-meter reach makes it challenging for Category 8 to be used to deliver higher bandwidth to the desktop or in other Enterprise applications in large-scale deployments.

5) Can Enterprise play, too?

Due to the reach limits of Category 8, Panduit recommends installing Category 6A today for all Enterprise applications. Category 6A supports up to 10GBASE-T at lengths up to 100 meters. Investing in a Category 6A infrastructure for your Enterprise space is the smartest and most cost-effective option for long-term optimal performance of your network. Panduit’s Advanced MaTriX Category 6A products have the additional advantage of allowing optimal heat dissipation and performance with next-generation Power over Ethernet (PoE++).

6) The next step …

Manufacturers are actively developing the next generation 25G and 40G products. Panduit expects to have its product offering – including cabling and connectivity – in 2017, to coincide with the launch of active equipment that will require the higher speeds.

Panduit has already received third-party approval on it’s upcoming Category 8 solution. Learn more here.

Why Is My Cable Pathway Upside Down?

Upside Down Design Can Keep Your Installation Costs Right Side Up

 

One of the most common questions asked about the Wyr-Grid Overhead Cable Pathway System is “why is it upside down?”

WG30BL

The Wyr-Grid tray is “upside down” because the design is based on a strong wire mesh platform reinforced with 1-1/2” high wire mesh walls that are oriented downward giving the appearance of an up-side down wire mesh tray. While appearing unconventional, this design combines the best attributes of cable runway with the flexibility and utility of wire mesh pathways.

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The Problem with High Density Fiber Enclosures – and the Solution

Last week I posted a blog about what is driving the adoption of high density fiber enclosures. High density fiber enclosures can help reduce the high cost of real estate. Possibly, one might find themselves with a data center where space is constrained so a high density fiber enclosure can help ease those space constraints.   I also said that high density fiber enclosures are used in data centers that are revenue generators because they make it possible to include more revenue-generating active equipment.

So a high density fiber enclosure helps add more equipment to a finite amount of space, but, as they say, there is no free lunch.

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What Is Driving Adoption of High Density Fiber Enclosures?

Real estate is one of the primary reasons that high density fiber enclosures are deployed in the data center. In some parts of the world, real estate is very expensive. One way to save cap ex is to try to use the smallest data center possible. The smaller the data center, the less square area required, and therefore, lower cap ex. This would certainly be the case if one is using a co-lo facility. Of course, a smaller data center also means lower op ex, e.g., less cooling, etc.

Another reason, also driven by real estate, is that the data center’s size is fixed. The data center cannot be enlarged. This might be the situation in dense urban areas where a larger space does not exist. The only way to add more functionality to the data center is to try and find a way to cram in more equipment. Hence, using a high density fiber enclosure.

Another less obvious reason for using a high density fiber enclosure is the trend towards data centers becoming profit centers. Historically, data centers were perceived as a cost of doing business. Depending on the business you are in, that may no longer be the case.

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