Specifying can help EPCs Improve Productivity and Installation for a Safe Environment

Specifying can help EPCs Improve Productivity and Installation for a Safe Environment

 

Here’s a fact. Electrical standards ensure product safety and reliability.

But, how do you know if a product is reliable if it’s not tested to rigorous standards? Or when it comes time for inspection, how can you ensure it was installed according to the required standard?

For example, something as seemingly benign as using a manufacturer’s lugs with a different manufacturer’s tool can cause a crimp to not be UL certified and thus not pass inspection, leading to costly re-work, cost, and time overruns.

Standards compliance also provides engineers and procurement with a baseline to read beyond a supplier’s marketing and compare products. Be sure that the manufacturer you are considering buying from provides external or self-declaring test reports in line with the standards required for the project. Also, make sure they comply with ALL of the standard’s requirements, and if they don’t, they need to explain why or what parts do not fully comply.

With the global scale of the projects that you work on, electrical standards ensure there is seamless integration when working across borders.

What is UL 467?

This is a general safety standard used in grounding and bonding. Various tests are conducted and requirements provided as a baseline of quality for grounding and bonding equipment.

In Panduit’s case, it provides this for our direct burial compression grounding connectors. All reputable manufacturers of direct burial compression grounding connectors comply with UL 467.

UL 467 provides five requirements: Tensile force strength, in other words, how much force can be applied before any movement is detected between the connector-wire connection.

  1. Short time current, which simulates a fault to make sure the connectors are doing what they are intended to do
  2. Corrosion resistance.
  3. Direct Burial rating or whether a grounding connection can be buried in the earth (dirt or concrete).
  4. Markings such as DB (direct burial rated), AL (for use with aluminum wire only), AL-CU (for use with both aluminum and copper wire

What is IEEE 837?

This is a more stringent electrical standard than UL467 and has only 2 revisions since 1989. It is self-proclaiming by the manufacturer and not subject to a third-party testing agency similar to UL. The manufacturer should provide their test data to show that they comply such as:

  1. IEEE 837-1989 à IEEE 837-2002
  2. IEEE 837-2002 à IEEE 837-2014

There are 3 key elements of IEEE 837-2014:

  1. Pull out test eliminated and UL 467 rating acceptable. This is about half as stringent as the 2002 edition.
  2. Short time current test with a stricter requirement than UL. Used to emulate a utility-scale fault. The short time current rating is about twice as stringent as the IEEE 837-2002 edition.
  3. Sequence testing used to emulate harsh and heavy environmental conditions.

What is IEC 61914-2015?

This specifies requirements and tests for cable cleats that are used to secure electrical cables. To fully comply, cable cleats must pass tests for resistance to flame propagation, impact, and ultraviolet light exposure, as well as for lateral retention.

Cable cleats provide resistance to electromechanical forces resulting from a short circuit event. IEC 61914-2015 provides testing standards for this product, including the following highlights:

  1. Temperature rating
  2. Adequate resistance to flame propagation
  3. Lateral load testing
  4. Axial load testing
  5. Impact resistance (very light, light, medium, heavy, and very heavy)
  6. Resistance to electromechanical forces (ability to withstand one or more short circuit events at the manufacturer’s declared values of peak short-circuit current)
  7. Adequate resistance to corrosion

Partner with a company committed to meeting the daily challenges you face. Panduit offers a full solution of over 30,000 readily available parts – from cable ties to power connectors, terminals to identification – Panduit products are engineered for all aspects of designing, installing and maintaining infrastructures within EPC environments.

Be Proactive, Not Reactive When It Comes To Your Maintenance Repair Operations

Every year, the rail industry spends billions of dollars to improve the national infrastructure. For example, American freight railroads spent $28 billion in 2014, and a projected $29 billion in 2015 on infrastructure and equipment. Although new projects draw the most attention, the majority of spend is on routine maintenance repair operations to ensure continuous safety and efficiency of the railroad system. There is a definite correlation between the increase in rail network investments and enhanced safety performance.

After a recent US passenger train accident last month, the Federal Railroad Administration issued a safety advisory for passenger railroads. The railroads are recommended to use an existing technology called Automatic Train Control (ATC) to alert trains appearing to be travelling at an excessive speed, in hopes they reduce their speed as they approach a curve or bridge. (On May 12, 2015, an Amtrak passenger train carrying 243 passengers and crew members derailed killing eight and injuring more than 200. The train was travelling well above the allowable speed limit for that area).

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Stainless Steel Cable Ties in Harsh Environments

Keeping your communications and power cables properly and safely installed in harsher environments such as Shipbuilding, Oil & Gas, and Chemical processing plants, as well as other similar applications, can be a challenge. However, it needs to be taken very seriously, otherwise the facility and personnel are being placed at elevated risk of injury or other adverse effects.

In order to ensure that proper cable fastening solutions are being implemented in these harsh environments, many times stainless steel cable ties will be specified for use.  However, not all stainless cable ties are created equal, and it is critical to thoroughly evaluate available options in order to choose the one that is safest and most reliable.

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Implementation of a Lockout/Tagout Program

To successfully implement a lockout/tagout program at your facility, each of the 5 elements below are needed:

1. Program: Lockout/Tagout Program Documentation
To create the Lockout/Tagout program documentation, several areas need to be addressed. These topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Purpose and Scope
  • Rules
  • Lockout Procedures and Techniques
  • Removal of Lockout Devices
  • Training
  • Tagout Procedures

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Short Circuit Faults – Are You Protected?

When running power cable through a facility using a ladder rack, the design considerations on how to affix the cables to the ladder arise. Options such as nylon cable ties, stainless strapping, cable cleats, tie wire and, believe it or not, even doing nothing at all, are all practices that have been witnessed in the field. In addition to cable management, engineering firms must also consider the implications of a short circuit fault as part of the design process. When a short circuit fault occurs, tremendous magnetic forces repel the power cables from each other resulting in violent forces that damage everything in their path.

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Safety in the Workplace

Recently we had the opportunity to guest write on Thorne and Derrick’s blog.  Below is what we published on the topic of Safety in the Workplace!

You may ask yourself why you need a safety services program in your organization?

It’s expensive, I need additional staff, and we haven’t had an incident yet…YET is the key word! It’s time to start being proactive instead of reactive! In addition to the numerous industry-wide standards for hazardous energy, electrical safety and environmental standards, the safety of your workplace and personnel should be a top of mind concern.

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Reduced Inefficiencies = Job Site Productivity

Efficiency is quickly becoming the mantra across construction organizations. Even minor variances in construction practices can affect profit. All components need to be designed and engineered for productivity, reliability and safety in order to meet or exceed industry standards and pass inspections. Mistakes on the job site cause delays or rework which increases overall project costs and can lead to missed deadlines:

  • Time lost when people, materials, or equipment are kept waiting
  • Poor handling of materials and equipment around a site
  • Excess materials not needed
  • Unsafe job site conditions due to improper grounding, arc flash hazards, worker injury/fatigue

Panduit can help you improve productivity, reliability and safety – with a full solution of over 30,000 available parts engineered to reduce installation time and costs, improve operational performance, and meet or exceed industry standards.

NECA 2014Stop by and see us at NECA Booth #211 and let us show you how
We’ve Got You Covered or visit us at www.panduit.com/buildnow.

Bringing Technology to the Job-Site

Job-sites are becoming more connected as technology continues to flourish. Understanding how it works and the value technology can bring to your job-site is crucial to ensuring operational efficiency.

Many of us have heard of IoT (Internet of Things) or IoE (Internet of Everything), but what exactly does that mean for you the contractor? Technology is impacting most job-sites around the world and understanding how to incorporate it within your next construction project is fundamental.

Panduit is adding mobility to your toolbox with the new Panduit Select Mobile App. Access, manage and share key product and project data both at the office and in the field.

 

Energy Boom Boosts Shipbuilding Construction

Check out this great blog citing the Wall Street Journal from The Center for Environment, Commerce & Energy on how shipping operators are pouring billions of dollars into the construction of oceangoing crude-oil carriers.

No matter where your shipbuilding operations reside – Panduit is there.
See how Panduit enables shipbuilders to address unique infrastructure challenges.

Panduit Shipbuilding Map

Importance of Lockout/Tagout

Lockout/Tagout is a process to control energy hazards for preventing accidental start-up or release of stored energy during set-up, maintenance and servicing of equipment. OSHA outlines this safety method in standard 29 CFR 1910.147 (“Control of Hazardous Energy”). Lockout/Tagout is a widely accepted practice for companies in the United States.   OSHA advises US companies, “Workers servicing or maintaining machines or equipment may be seriously injured or killed if hazardous energy is not properly controlled. Injuries resulting from the failure to control hazardous energy during maintenance activities can be serious or fatal! Injuries may include electrocution, burns, crushing, cutting, lacerating, amputating, or fracturing body parts, and others….Craft workers, electricians, machine operators, and laborers are among the 3 million workers who service equipment routinely and face the greatest risk of injury. Workers injured on the job from exposure to hazardous energy lose an average of 24 workdays for recuperation.” Here are 3 examples of accidents due to a lack of Lockout/Tagout practices:

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