The Roadmap to Your HDV Success: What Standard You Need to Know for Wire Systems in 2019

As with many industries, the heavy-duty vehicle industry faces challenges with evolving safety standards and certification requirements. Many of these requirements may come from governments or regulatory agencies or may be more informal yet voluntary standards adopted by the industry. Staying familiar with these ever-changing regulations can be a daunting task, especially when factoring in regional or country-specific nuances.   

Every component you are designing into a product likely also has a required certification or standard that your product needs to be in compliance with. For instance, whether you are designing to transport people or goods, a heavy-duty vehicle will have a complex electrical wiring system. The electrical connectors and wiring materials you design into that system are critical, with the need to withstand dirt, debris, high heat, extreme cold, friction, corrosion and rigidity. Exposure to one of these elements and even the slightest damage to a small electrical component can cause havoc on the entire system.

With more than 50 years of proven experience in wire harness and heavy duty cable management, we know that designing with the right materials can mean the difference between meeting your complex specifications and regulatory requirements – or not. It is why we work so hard to push for standardization – not only to improve upon our own excellence, but to give the entire industry a benchmark upon which they can deliver quality products resulting in higher customer satisfaction, while improving their own productivity and profitability.

That is why changes happening this year are significant for those designing heavy-duty vehicles: the new ANSI UL 62275 publication has harmonized with CSA C22.2 No. 62275 (Canada), NMX-J-623-ANCE (Mexico) and IEC 62275 (Europe), establishing a standard type classification and performance ratings for plastic cable ties, mounts, metallic cable ties, and integral cable tie mounts.

Major changes include:

  1. A requirement of parallel entry metallic cable ties to be tested with the locking mechanism positioned at 9:00, whereas testing may have been conducted previously at 12:00.
  2. Coated metallic cable ties are currently classified as Type 21 products but will be classified as Type 2 under ANSI UL 62275.
  3. The contribution to fire test will now be needed to classify coated metallic cable ties as Type 2.
  4. Products classified as outdoor use products will be required to run the environmental exposure test at a spectral irradiance of 0.51, with the previous irradiance value being 0.35.
  5. Testing under ANSI UL 62275 will include tensile strength, minimum operating temperature, minimum installation temperature, minimum and maximum bundle diameter, UV resistance, vibration for metallic cable ties-cycling, corrosion, contribution to fire-needle flame, and plenum.

So what does this mean exactly?

The UL 62275 standard will be critical for the heavy-duty vehicles industry going because it ensures an increase in quality and safety. It also cuts down on the number of products to be tested, reducing the time, money and paperwork needed to ensure certification or compliance. Without harmonization, an OEM may be required to use different wire harness products based on a heavy-duty vehicle’s ultimate destination, taking up time and putting more pressure on workers to complete tests for each regional standard.

Instead, OEMs may now have more time for R&D to further advance their designs to better serve the end-user. Not only will this provide customers with better products, but will encourage a whole new host of innovation within the heavy-duty vehicle sector.

To get more insight into UL 622275, read our white paper Prepare for the Future: What Global Standards Harmonization Will Mean for the Wire Harness Industry.


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Utilizing Large Contract Buyers Helps Wire Harness Manufacturers Navigate Nylon 6/6 Shortages

The practical applications for Nylon 6/6 are incredibly vast today, more-so than when it first rose to prominence during 1940s wartime. While this has been great for the advancement of innovation, it has resulted in its demand to increase and its supply to correspondingly decrease.

What Is Causing The Shortage?

Manufactured in four high-volume plants – three in the U.S. and one in France – Nylon 6/6 is primarily used when high mechanical strength, great rigidity, and good stability under heat is required. While markets for Nylon 6/6 include industrial applications, power tools, and cable ties, most of it goes into auto applications. This can include air intake manifolds, ball bearing cages, bushings, gears, electrical components, oil pans, and other various machined parts and under hood components. But perhaps most prominently, Nylon 6/6 is the material that makes up most airbags.

This is notable because safety regulations and standards are becoming increasingly more stringent and widespread. With no signs of that trend slowing down, the need for Nylon 6/6 will increasingly become that much greater. And because the global economy has been recession-free for nearly a decade, car production is booming. Demand for Nylon 6/6 has never been greater.

Unfortunately, production of it is struggling to keep up. Demand for it is growing at the same time the world supply is decreasing, and OEM customers who are standardized on it may experience spot shortages. As a result, wire harness manufacturers need to prepare and act to protect their core business. The best way to do this is to partner with large contract buyers.

Large Contract Buying Vs. Spot Purchasing

Large contract buying is one of two traditional methods for obtaining Nylon 6/6. It’s where companies – like Panduit – contract with companies to guarantee them a percentage of their business and in return they get a guaranteed contract price and continuity of supply. So if a disaster or accident decreases the supply further, large contract buyers go to the front of the line for the remaining supply when there is an allocation.

At the back of the line and potentially without supply? Those using the other method of obtaining Nylon 6/6 – spot purchasing. This method is used by those requiring smaller amounts of the material.

With spot purchasing, cable tie manufacturers are reaching out to their suppliers to conduct one-off purchases. This allows for manufacturers to shop for the best price at any given time and keep that supply stored. This can be advantageous in a long market because the plants have capacity that needs to go somewhere, so they attempt to get what they can for it. However, in a short market, spot purchasers are at an extremely high disadvantage and may be unable to get Nylon 6/6 if the supply runs out.

Breaking down both strategies is a risk mitigation exercise. When supply is low, companies and large contract buyers like Panduit will get their Nylon 6/6. Spot purchasers? Potentially not. Not to mention, the market doesn’t dictate the price of large contract buyer supplies like it does for spot purchasers. While their price is not completely fixed, large contract buyers are more reliably low than spot buyers.

What Can You Do To Ensure You Don’t Experience An Interruption?

It’s no secret that the supply chain of Nylon 6/6 is under extreme pressure. But this bleak forecast doesn’t need to be a cause for concern for wire harness manufacturers who partner with wire management solutions providers that use a dependable long-term logistics model. Utilizing the services of large contract buyers like Panduit, wire harness manufacturers can ensure the supply of Nylon 6/6 won’t affect the productivity of their business and that prices won’t wildly fluctuate on the products they need.

The Potential for A Technological Revolution Requires Wire Harness Standards Harmonization

Whether you’re talking about the automotive, energy or telecom industry, standards have been the core of every technological revolution. Now, with the recent publication of ANSI/UL 62275, wire harness manufacturing can finally experience its own.

Up until now wire assembly has been a very manual industry, relying heavily on people and processes to manufacture the materials. But with ANSI/UL 62275’s adoption of IEC 62275 in the U.S. and harmonizing of CSA C22.2 No. 62275 (Canada), NMX-J-623-ANCE (Mexico) and IEC 62278 (Europe), a substantial opportunity has appeared for manufacturers to promote high value, consistent quality, and a safe and efficient application.

Regional standards bodies around the world.

The harmonization of wire harness standards includes participation from several regional standards bodies.


This harmonized standard for cable ties for electrical installations – including plastic and metallic cable ties, mounts and integral cable tie mounts – will provide wire harness component manufacturers test procedures to conduct rigorous tensile strength, minimum operating and installation temperature, vibration, corrosion, flame and plenum tests, among others, through one organization.

As a result, when a global component supplier is selected to ship to the U.S., Canada, Mexico, Europe, or other regions that accept these harmonized standards, customers can be assured of the delivery of a product that is high quality and of performance at lower installed costs with reduced risks. Without harmonization, a wire processing company may be required to use different products based on the end destination.

Base standards for wire management products have historically always included regional standards from the Association of Standardization and Certification (ANCE Mexico), ANSI/UL Underwriters Laboratories-US, CSA Group (CSA Canada) or EN/IEC (European Standards), resulting in varying benchmarks for compliance testing and certifications. Due to this complexity, wire management customers have not always had the consistent benchmark of performance and quality that they deserve, which has often resulted in unexpected total business costs.

Now, by reducing the number of separate standards and testing requirements, high quality and product performance based on the successful completion of test standards has been ensured. While all regional standards ANCE, CSA, IEC and UL have a stability date of December 2018, updated standards will be introduced in 2019. As this switchover nears, it is vital that we start educating customers on these requirements now.

Ahead of the anticipated changes customers need to learn the benefits for their applications. Not only will this provide customers with better products, but we believe that the availability of this harmonized standard will encourage a whole new host of innovation across different sectors – from energy to military and defense and aerospace, to medical devices to the broader industrial market.

History shows that we all win by embracing standards harmonization. Now is the time for implementation and education so that innovation can be right around the corner.

To learn more about how ANSI UL 62275 will forever improve the wire management industry, watch our webinar, Why Global Standards Harmonization is Critical for the Future of Wire Harness.