Can your infrastructure meet the requirements of MiFID II?

With GDPR still a prevalent concern across the financial services industry, financial institutions face another major regulatory challenge in the form of the Markets in Financial Instruments Directive II (MiFID II). In the UK alone, the Financial Conduct Authority received 1,335 notifications of inaccurate transaction reporting under (MiFID II during 2018*).

The directive is multi-faceted. Ostensibly, the EU designed it to offer more protection to investors by introducing greater transparency to asset classes, whether they’re equities, fixed income, exchange traded funds or foreign exchange.

But this has consequences for your underlying networking infrastructure, which is required to support greater and more timely data transactions. This is especially pertinent for trading firms in the High Frequency Trading (HFT) sector, where trimming network latency by nanoseconds results in increased profits and competitive advantage.

With this in mind, MiFID II mandates latency standards across global banking networks. It also requires communication across those networks to be captured and recorded in real-time, and time-stamped accordingly.

Time stamping is a critical factor, requiring correct handling, with uniform latency across a network helping to create a consolidated view of network transactions which all carry accurate time-stamps.

There are certain technical standards for time-stamping that firms must meet under the new directive. Among these are: choosing the clock that you will use as a reference; indicating the type of organizations involved in a trade; defining the type of trade; and the level of time-stamp granularity -e.g. microseconds or nanoseconds. If you, as a trader, are dealing with a dual-listed, cross-border stock that covers two time zones, your infrastructure needs to be sufficiently uniform so you can document well and timestamp accurately. Once again, latency is the key.

The consequences are even fiercer than with GDPR, as non-compliant companies risk fines of up to €5m, or up to 10% of global turnover**. This is a concern for the 65% of capital market firms across Europe who stated in a 2018 survey that they had no adequate or systematic method in place to monitor trades in accordance with best execution criteria***.

Read this blog to find out how else you should be equipping your network infrastructure to ensure efficiency.  

*  https://www.ftadviser.com/regulation/2019/04/10/more-than-1-000-mifid-ii-breaches-reported-to-fca/

**  https://www.pwc.ch/en/publications/2018/solgari-industry-report.pdf 

***    https://www.finextra.com/blogposting/16488/mifid-ii—one-year-on

Panduit® Technical Engineer Andy Booth Joins IEC Committee on Cable Cleats

IEC 61914- compliant cable cleat solutions help ensure safety during short circuit events

Andy Booth, Panduit’s Technical Engineer has been elected as a US expert on the committee responsible for overseeing the IEC 61914 standard on cable cleats for electrical installations. This ensures that Panduit remains ahead of the game with regards to standards compliance and safety, and puts their new range of cable cleats in a market-leading position.

“Having worked with the committee previously, I’m really looking forward to joining back up with some old colleagues to continue this important work,” said Booth, a chartered engineer with over 20 years of experience in the industry and a senior member of IEEE.

Since its first publication in 2009, the maintenance committee for the IEC 61914 standard have worked towards a harmonized, easy-to-understand technical publication. Its aim is to provide cleat manufacturers with clear, unbiased guidance on the safe cable cleat design and testing. Having representation on the committee further enhances Panduit’s leadership on the harmonization of standards and ability to ensure future product development meets standards requirements.

Cable cleats ensure cables remain contained in the event of a short circuit fault, minimizing disruption and damage to personnel and property. In the U.S., NEC 392.20(C) governs the safety of the cable installations in cable trays but does not currently provide adequate guidance on how to securely contain cables in the event of a short circuit.

The internationally recognized IEC 61914 standard provides the testing methodology and process to ensure cable cleat reliability, including temperature rating, resistance to flame propagation, lateral and axial load testing, impact resistance, corrosion resistance, and resistance to electromechanical forces.

Assurance and insurance bundled together, cable cleats are an investment worth making to help prevent project rework and ensure safety. Panduit’s IEC 61914-compliant solutions—including stainless steel locking strap cleats, stainless steel buckle strap cleats, stainless steel trefoil cleats, and aluminum and polymer cleats—are uniquely engineered for ease of installation in a range of applications and harsh environments.


Learn more about why cable cleats are vital for protecting major infrastructure projects here.  

Supporting Video Games (and Academics) at Universities

With the ever-increasing popularity of video games, it’s no surprise that there’s a day dedicated to recognizing video games and the gamers playing them. July 8 is Video Games Day, so whether you’re more inclined to crush candies or join friends for a round or two (or 10) of Fortnite, today’s your day!

In the world of online gaming, players want fast upload speeds, even faster download speeds, and low lag. When multiple players are using the same internet connection, the required capacity is multiplied by the number of players.

For most of us, that’s a function of our home internet connection. However, there’s one location where this need for bandwidth is crucial because of sheer volume: the college or university residence hall. Gaming consoles are among the average of eight wireless devices students bring with them when they move on campus. (Curious about the others? Phones, laptops and tablets, as well as smart TVs, wireless printers and wearables are among the other common devices.)

What’s a university to do when the primary gaming demographic is the same demographic as their enrollment … and they all want those fast speeds and low lag rates at the same time? Fear not. There are solutions. And the good news is, when wireless coverage is sufficient to support online gaming, it is adequate to support academic needs also!

Look at Coverage and Capacity

Coverage and capacity provide two approaches to improving the performance of a wireless network.

Coverage: With 100 percent wireless coverage in all areas of the residence hall, students and staff will be able to connect and have Wi-Fi service everywhere they need it. If there are areas where interference and dead zones are an issue, a wireless site survey can determine coverage needs and identify any remediation that is needed. It’s also a good idea to keep an inventory of all wireless devices and their operating frequencies to manage and limit interference between devices.

Capacity: Wireless capacity is the ability of the network to provide reliable, responsive wireless access to the growing number of wireless devices that are competing for bandwidth – in other words, each of those eight devices that students are bringing to campus. This could require more access points in closer proximity, higher power access points, or a mix of both.

Without addressing the wireless needs, you might find that students will take matters into their own hands and bring personal routers, which can wreak havoc with the university’s installed infrastructure. A robust wireless network that meets both coverage and capacity will eliminate these rogue routers before they become a problem.

Increase your Bandwidth

For more than a decade, wireless has been the application driving the need for higher performance cabling infrastructure. The latest generations of WAPs are designed to simultaneously support more than 200 client devices. To get the promised performance, however, the cabling infrastructure that connects the WAP has to perform to those standards.

Wi-Fi 6 (the common name for IEEE 802.11ax) is poised to become the largest and fastest growing wireless standard in history. And, Wi-Fi 7 is fast on the heels of Wi-Fi 6, with significant improvements beyond Wi-Fi 6. If you’re installing or upgrading cabling infrastructure today, you’ll want to be sure it meets the requirements for Wi-Fi 7 at a minimum, so you’re prepared for future generations of access points.

This means Category 6A cabling, to support 10GBASE-T, plus two to four cables per access port. Why four? A minimum of two cables is required to allow for speeds up to 20 Gbps with link aggregation. An additional two Cat 6A cables are then recommended to allow for increased densities over time. It’s easier and cheaper to install the added cables today, than it is to add them later.

Consider Power over Ethernet

Power over Ethernet (PoE) is the new power grid in today’s buildings, with the latest PoE standards allowing for up to 99W of power via the same structured cabling that is moving data to and from the device. Wireless access points are a prime candidate for PoE. With PoE, WAPs can be moved, added and reconfigured at will, without worrying about whether there is an electrical source near the access point.

Once again, Category 6A is the go-to for PoE. The construction of Category 6A cables means they are better equipped to handle the heat rise that comes with PoE. Panduit’s Vari-MaTriX Cat 6A cables are designed with improved thermal capacity, to provide the ultimate in heat rise protection for PoE.

Design for Aesthetics

If you’re adding wireless capacity to existing residence halls, you might not be able to run cabling infrastructure above the ceiling, where that infrastructure typically lives in newer buildings. In cases like this, we’ve seen universities have success using a raceway to contain the cabling infrastructure.

Purdue University successfully added wireless capacity in historic residence halls using a raceway solution plus small diameter cabling. Learn more about the award-winning Purdue project in our Purdue University Case Study.

Game On!

Adding or improving wireless capacity for resident students doesn’t have to be a daunting task. With the right infrastructure in place, paired with our recommendations above, your students will be ready to game – or study – to their hearts’ content.

Latency is only the start of the challenge

There’s a clear need for a latency standard that can be applied globally across financial institutions. But that’s just one step. The real challenge emerges when you ask why this standard is necessary, and what it means for the future success of your business.

Latency is key to your success because if it isn’t perfectly calibrated, it’ll cost you. According to a study by the Tabb Group, if your infrastructure allows even 5ms of lag, you could lose an astounding $4m per millisecond across transactions.*

The reality is that the demand on your digital infrastructure has never been higher. We live in a world of high-speed financial trading. Data needs to be processed, analyzed, and transmitted at lightning speeds to meet the global, mobile, and 24/7 demands for instantaneous transactions and transfers.

Moreover, when positions change in an instant, latency isn’t just a matter of efficiency. It’s a matter of profitability. Which means that your infrastructure must be up to task if your institution is to remain viable over the coming years.

That’s why it’s vital to have a next-gen digital infrastructure architecture that’s robust and reliable. Joe Skorupa, VP Distinguished Analyst at Gartner Data Centre Convergence, recently commented*, “I have known major financial organizations make multi-million dollar investments only to rip-and-replace them the very next day if a technology comes along that improves their competitive edge.

However, the network hasn’t really changed in the last few decades because network folk are conservative. The reasons are quite clear: if a server in a data center fails, your application goes down; but if your network goes down your entire data center goes down.”

Skorupa highlights the latency issue right here. In order to benefit from super-speed transactions, and make the most of your digital transformation, you need to equivalize latency across your entire network. This involves taking an in-depth look at your existing physical infrastructure, and determining where change is required.

Upgrading and consolidating your data centre infrastructure can also help to mitigate risk, and future-proof the business, as this blog post explains [http://panduitblog.com/2019/04/29/datacenter/consolidation-the-pros-and-cons-of-putting-your-eggs-in-one-basket/].

As a trusted infrastructure partner, Panduit can help you tackle your latency issues, and ensure the right networking technologies are underpinning your financial services.

##

*Source: https://datacentrenews.eu/story/opinion-automating-the-data-center-with-ibn, October 2018

*Source: The Value of a Millisecond: Finding the Optimal Speed of a Trading Infrastructure, April 2008

How to ensure your electrical safety program is driving compliance in 2019

Ensuring compliance with an electrical safety program isn’t always easy, but there are plenty of tools available to help you succeed.

As a safety manager, your job is not only to be prepared and consistent with regards to all aspects of plant safety, but also to make sure that everyone else – from management through to janitorial and office staff – prioritize safety as much as you do. Being proactive will result in your facility being in compliance – or not – as well helping to avoid serious injuries and fatalities around the workplace.

A good place to begin preparation is in places that are frequently overlooked. OSHA’s top cited violations tell us that electrical safety falls into this category. Being knowledgeable on the latest updated standards can help modernize your electrical safety programs, while also providing opportunities to address evolving safety concerns with employees so that all are up-to-date on best practices in electrical safety and incidents are avoided.

As one example, OSHA found failing to properly control energy accounted for nearly 10 percent of serious accidents in many industries. Realizing that its existing measures weren’t enough, OSHA recommended the creation of NFPA 70E, a requirement for safe work practices to protect personnel by reducing exposure to major electrical hazards.

OSHA’s general duty clause requires facilities to provide employees with a place of employment that is “free from recognized hazards that are causing or are likely to cause death or serious harm.” While NFPA 70E is a voluntary standard, with its compliance not required by law, it effectively describes electrical hazards and best practices to mitigate them. Because OSHA regulations are not frequently updated, they will often reference consensus standards such as NFPA 70E as a best practice when issuing citations to the general duty clause.

Implementing NFPA 70E In Your Facility

NFPA 70E helps facilities and employees avoid workplace injuries and fatalities due to shock, electrocution, arc flash, and arc blast during maintenance and construction in industrial plants. There are a couple of areas where you will need to update training procedures within your facility in order to comply with NFPA 70E:

An example of lockout/tagout

Lockout/Tagout (LOTO). Every year workers are unnecessarily exposed to hazardous energy sources during servicing, maintenance, or setting up equipment. By implementing a lockout device to ensure that equipment on the energy isolating device cannot be operated until the lockout device is removed and a tagout device to indicate that an energy isolating device may not be operated until the tagout device is removed, risks such as injuries, asset damage and production downtime are diminished.

When it comes to implementing a LOTO program to adhere to NFPA 70E, three types of employees need to be covered:

  • Authorized Employees are responsible for implementing energy control procedures and performing the required servicing or maintenance. Training for Authorized Employees includes details about the type and magnitude of the hazardous energy sources present at the facility, and the methods for isolating and controlling these energy sources. Authorized Employees must also receive training on machine-specific procedures.
  • Affected Employees operate equipment or work in an area in which an energy control procedure is being implemented. Affected employees are not themselves responsible for locking and tagging out, but must understand their purpose in order to avoid attempts to start up or use equipment during these procedures.
  • Other Employees include office or warehouse personnel who may work in an area where an energy control procedure is utilized.

Verifying Absence of Voltage. When electrical maintenance is needed, NFPA 70E requires that workers establish and verify equipment is in an electrically safe state. This involves a test for absence of voltage. Although NFPA 70E is comprehensive around LOTO guidelines and the need to first verify the absence of voltage, it does not articulate the removal of hazards before this maintenance or inspection begins, therefore increasing risk to the electrician. Eliminating a hazard is the most effective method according to the hierarchy of controls, and should be the first choice whenever possible. NFPA 70E emphasizes the need to work on electrical systems only when they are placed in an electrically safe working condition, but creating and verifying this condition requires more than just de-energizing, as it involves multiple steps to confirm the system is safe and to verify the absence of voltage.

Absence of Voltage Testers (AVTs) are permanently-mounted testing devices that are specifically designed to determine if a circuit part is de-­energized prior to opening panels or removing covers to access and maintain electrical equipment. They are designed to automatically run internal diagnostics and administer the live-dead-live type of verification testing with an internal known voltage source and actively indicate the absence of voltage. AVTs also help improve electrical safety through a Prevention through Design approach, making them an ideal option for maintenance and service professionals.

While training can deliver the results a facility is looking for, every plant is different and safety professionals should seek out third-party support in order to better understand the latest standards that can keep them in compliance. For more information on best practices for implementing a modernized safety program, read our new eBook How Understanding the Hierarchy of Controls can Lead to Reduced Electrical Incidents.

Consultative Application Engineering Program to Support Heavy-Duty Equipment OEM Customers

For the many design decisions and application issues encountered, help is needed to identify the cable management products best suited for each application. Panduit provides consultative engineering services to engineers working on Truck, Bus and Heavy Equipment applications. The program, which provides industry best practice recommendations, application specific observations and an optional engineering review, is customized to each OEM customer’s application, resulting in new, innovative designs and products for its customers.

“Panduit draws on its more than 60 years of application engineering experience and robust heavy-duty cable management solutions. We partner with our customers to support their most challenging wire and cable management applications and needs,” said Mark Pfaller, cable tie product strategy manager, Panduit. “From project start through successful completion, we work with designers to identify the right products to achieve optimal application performance for the lowest possible installed costs.”

Consultative Application Engineering is an example of what helps set Panduit apart from many others in the industry. Panduit has moved beyond simply selling customers a product. Having dedicated technical experts providing personalized application support is the culmination of a journey that began more than a decade ago.

“During conversations with our customers, we wanted to better understand their challenges and problems. Taking the time to ask more questions that go beyond a specific product was critical in this journey. Customers helped us recognize a gap that many of them had when it comes to in-house expertise and best practices of specific wire harness applications,” said Pfaller.

This specialized support can be beneficial to both OEMs and the wire harness manufacturer or subcontractor that the OEM may work with for wire harness applications – because they collaborate on producing the best possible final products and both should be knowledgeable in the best practices for the unique applications they’re working within.

The Consultative Application Engineering Program supports OEM design engineers with best practice recommendations, including:

  • Material Review: Panduit will assess material capabilities and call attention to any issues related to high temperature, high vibration conditions, and UV exposure.
  • Installation Practices: Panduit will evaluate installation practices to improve operational productivity and identify opportunities for part consolidation and material use reduction.
  • Tooling Maintenance Program: Panduit will further develop a designer’s tooling maintenance program to promote uptime and reduce the lifetime cost of ownership.
  • Develop Customized Products: Panduit ensures custom solutions are built to optimize every step of the operation for its customer application needs by consulting multiple departments including production, engineering, and quality control.

“The customers who see tremendous value in this service have engineers that are typically very well-versed when it comes to the system they’re working on but they may not have as much expertise in the appropriate wire and cable management best practices for their unique application, so they lean on their partners,” said Pfaller.

Dedicated Research & Development and Testing for OEM Design Engineers

Panduit spends time with each customer to talk about industry best practices, including wire management concepts that have successfully solved problems for other customers and the financial benefits when applying similar solutions to their own applications.

But recognizing general examples don’t necessarily address a customer’s unique needs. A dedicated team of technical sales engineers, advanced product development, and technical application team with deeper expertise provide the next stage of value-added services. Sometimes this means creation of a custom product to fit the exact specification.

Through significant investment in research and development, as well as participation in industry standard bodies to meet new and complex regulatory requirements, Panduit works with its customers’ to meet their exact specifications for the next product cycle, and for technologies on their roadmap in the future. Panduit also ensures rapid integration within and delivery of a high-quality product that is responsible to cost and innovation.

For more information on this program, contact the Panduit Customer Service Group or a local Panduit Sales Representative at 800-777-3300 or cs@panduit.com.

Panduit at the Electrical Wire Processing Expo 2019

Panduit’s leadership in the wire harness market is on full display this year at the Electrical Wire Processing Show.  Customers have the chance to learn about and demo our products, interact with product experts, and receive the full Panduit experience. Panduit’s EWPT 2019 booth was designed to showcase our focus on productivity and worker ergonomics.  

This year we strengthened our productivity enhancing systems offering by adding a bowl fed ferrule strip and crimp machine and a new ferrule crimp applicator.  These products combined with our legacy installation tooling keeps workers happy, healthy, and productive.

Also, making its debut at the show, the flush mount fixture for our PAT4.0 system provides the optimal ergonomic bundling solution for applications where operators can bring the work to the tool.  Ergonomic improvement over traditional table top bundling methods is achieved via elimination of a foot pedal and eliminating the need to “lift” the work up off the table top during cable tie installation.

“The Electrical Wire Processing Technology Expo allows both customers and suppliers to keep pulse of the Wire Harness market.  We need to understand current customer needs and pain points to ensure that we are offering solutions that address them.  Panduit has been an exhibitor for many years and will continue to be a part of this show in the future”, said Scott Lesniak, Product Strategy Manager for OEM Automated Systems.

Another facet of Panduit’s offering is our Consultative Application Engineering Program that provides industry best practice recommendations, application specific observations, and an optional engineering review.   The program is designed to analyze and understand OEM customer’s specific needs and applications and tailor solutions via Panduit products and services that will improve quality, reliability, productivity, and profitability for these customers.

“Panduit draws on its more than 60 years of application engineering experience and robust heavy-duty cable management solutions. We partner with our customers to support their most challenging wire and cable management applications and needs,” said Mark Pfaller, Cable Tie Product Strategy Manager, Panduit. “From project start through successful completion, we work with designers to identify the right products to achieve optimal application performance for the lowest possible installed costs.”

To learn more about Panduit at the EWPT show, please view our video.

InfoComm 2019: Atlona and Panduit Showcase End-to-End AV Solution

In just a couple days, the Pro AV industry will begin to gather in Orlando for InfoComm 2019, an opportunity to learn from industry leaders, see new products, and connect with colleagues in North America’s largest AV show. Panduit, in conjunction with recently acquired Atlona, will be showing a complete end-to-end AV over IP system, featuring Atlona’s OmniStream™ solution, plus the infrastructure and connectivity needed for a quality AV ecosystem.

Visitors to Atlona’s booth (3012) will see everything needed to add collaboration capabilities to a conference room, classroom or huddle space, or to add or upgrade digital signage within their facility. This includes a variety of components from Atlona, no stranger to InfoComm and the AV environment. Panduit, which acquired Atlona in January, will demonstrate its latest enterprise-level equipment racks, cabinets and connectivity solutions for AV, with a focus on helping integrators and end users streamline the installation and management of their core system architectures.

The big change in the Atlona booth this year is the addition of Panduit’s infrastructure solutions:

  • Quality twisted pair copper cabling and connectivity to connect switchers and extenders
  • Equipment racks and wall-mount cabinets that house AV and networking equipment
  • In-room solutions including table boxes that provide connectivity for meeting participants, in-wall boxes to house gear behind monitors, and Above Floor Raceway to safely and efficiently route data, power, and AV cables in rooms where core drilling isn’t feasible

For Panduit, InfoComm provides us an opportunity to close the knowledge gap around how to identify and choose the most appropriate Layer 1 infrastructure for each AV project. We’re excited to speak with Atlona partners and customers about how Panduit can help them deploy Atlona products easier and faster with quality cable management, reliable infrastructure, and secure connectivity.

Panduit AV Infrastructure

Panduit will emphasize key solutions at its dedicated station in the Atlona booth:

  • Panduit Two-Post Rack System: This dual-column data rack offers a reliable foundation for mounting AV and data center equipment and is ideal for installation in enterprise-wide IT distribution closets. Its modular design offers side access with plenty of space to efficiently install, manage and organize cables, patch panels and other accessories, reducing installation times by up to 15 percent compared to competitive solutions. The display will feature a wide variety of Panduit cabling and connectivity, as well as cable management solutions.
  • Panduit Wall-Mount Cabinets: Offering the same foundational strength and systems integration efficiency as Panduit’s two-post racks, these compact cabinets provide a secure and reliable solution for facilities requiring infrastructure and patching solutions in open spaces, or in equipment rooms with limited real estate.
  • Panduit Field-Terminable Plugs: These modular plugs allow contractors to run horizontal cable direct to equipment, eliminating the need for jacks, surface-mounted boxes and/or patch cords – reducing installation times and upfront costs by up to 40 percent, while eliminating multiple points of failure.
  • Panduit In-Room AV Solutions: In-wall and in-table boxes, while not the central point in any AV system, make it easier for users to connect and collaborate. And, Panduit’s award-winning Above Floor Raceway is easy to install, easy to use, durable and ADA compliant – everything you want in your conference rooms or huddle spaces.

Panduit will populate the two-post racks and wall-mounted cabinets with Atlona equipment, including OmniStream AV over IP devices – a springboard for a broader conversation about how quality infrastructure and connectivity will ensure that video, audio and data signal integrity is maintained across the ecosystem. Panduit representatives will also be on hand to discuss other infrastructure concerns, including the benefits and ideal scenarios of applying unshielded cable versus shielded cable, for example.

Beyond offering a robust and reliable infrastructure, we look forward to demonstrating how our systems provide the generous headroom and bandwidth required to support the higher resolution of 4K/UHD and HDR signals moving across the enterprise. Quality infrastructure directly relates to the quality of the AV signals being deployed. The better the quality of the cable and connectivity you have, the less you need to worry about pixel drops, discoloration, and other undesirable visual artifacts.

InfoComm 2019 takes place from June 12-14 at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, Florida. If you haven’t already secured a free pass, you can register for a free pass using code ATL175.

The Roadmap to Your HDV Success: What Standard You Need to Know for Wire Systems in 2019

As with many industries, the heavy-duty vehicle industry faces challenges with evolving safety standards and certification requirements. Many of these requirements may come from governments or regulatory agencies or may be more informal yet voluntary standards adopted by the industry. Staying familiar with these ever-changing regulations can be a daunting task, especially when factoring in regional or country-specific nuances.   

Every component you are designing into a product likely also has a required certification or standard that your product needs to be in compliance with. For instance, whether you are designing to transport people or goods, a heavy-duty vehicle will have a complex electrical wiring system. The electrical connectors and wiring materials you design into that system are critical, with the need to withstand dirt, debris, high heat, extreme cold, friction, corrosion and rigidity. Exposure to one of these elements and even the slightest damage to a small electrical component can cause havoc on the entire system.

With more than 50 years of proven experience in wire harness and heavy duty cable management, we know that designing with the right materials can mean the difference between meeting your complex specifications and regulatory requirements – or not. It is why we work so hard to push for standardization – not only to improve upon our own excellence, but to give the entire industry a benchmark upon which they can deliver quality products resulting in higher customer satisfaction, while improving their own productivity and profitability.

That is why changes happening this year are significant for those designing heavy-duty vehicles: the new ANSI UL 62275 publication has harmonized with CSA C22.2 No. 62275 (Canada), NMX-J-623-ANCE (Mexico) and IEC 62275 (Europe), establishing a standard type classification and performance ratings for plastic cable ties, mounts, metallic cable ties, and integral cable tie mounts.

Major changes include:

  1. A requirement of parallel entry metallic cable ties to be tested with the locking mechanism positioned at 9:00, whereas testing may have been conducted previously at 12:00.
  2. Coated metallic cable ties are currently classified as Type 21 products but will be classified as Type 2 under ANSI UL 62275.
  3. The contribution to fire test will now be needed to classify coated metallic cable ties as Type 2.
  4. Products classified as outdoor use products will be required to run the environmental exposure test at a spectral irradiance of 0.51, with the previous irradiance value being 0.35.
  5. Testing under ANSI UL 62275 will include tensile strength, minimum operating temperature, minimum installation temperature, minimum and maximum bundle diameter, UV resistance, vibration for metallic cable ties-cycling, corrosion, contribution to fire-needle flame, and plenum.

So what does this mean exactly?

The UL 62275 standard will be critical for the heavy-duty vehicles industry going because it ensures an increase in quality and safety. It also cuts down on the number of products to be tested, reducing the time, money and paperwork needed to ensure certification or compliance. Without harmonization, an OEM may be required to use different wire harness products based on a heavy-duty vehicle’s ultimate destination, taking up time and putting more pressure on workers to complete tests for each regional standard.

Instead, OEMs may now have more time for R&D to further advance their designs to better serve the end-user. Not only will this provide customers with better products, but will encourage a whole new host of innovation within the heavy-duty vehicle sector.

To get more insight into UL 622275, read our white paper Prepare for the Future: What Global Standards Harmonization Will Mean for the Wire Harness Industry.


https://pages.panduit.com/2018-07-Content_OEM_WP-WH-Standards_LP—Registration.html?utm_medium=content-syndication&utm_source=panduit-blog&utm_campaign=2019-transportation-owned&utm_content=roadmap-hdv-blog

Five OSHA Regulation Changes That Could Impact Your Facility This Year

Hardhats in a row at a job site.
OSHA’s $5 million budget increase could suggest an increase in regulatory actions, inspections, and citations, as the organization has regulatory changes in store for the year ahead.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) fiscal year 2019 budget, according to Industrial Safety and Hygiene News, increased by $5 million over 2018 to reach a $557.8 million total. This increase could suggest an increase in regulatory actions, inspections, and citations, as the organization has regulatory changes in store for the year ahead. While these safety regulation updates and additions are spread across several industries, here are five that workers and facilities should be prepared for.

IEEE 1584-2018

Published just before December of last year, this Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers guide for performing arc flash hazard calculations was significantly updated from IEEE 1584-2002.

Related to the method for calculating the arc flash hazard distance and the incident energy to which employees could be exposed during work on or near electrical equipment, designers and facility operators in facilities where live work is performed on electrical equipment need to become especially familiar with this change. With arc flash hazard calculations being implemented in most plants because of OSHA regulations, this new model accurately accounts for a wide variety of setup parameters.

Employers should be sure to confirm that an arc flash risk assessment has been done within the last five years. Calculations are most often listed on arc flash and equipment labels and are used as part of an arc flash risk assessment. Updates to labels to reflect new calculation requirements may be necessary depending on the results of the arc flash assessment.

Increased Fines

To adjust for inflation, and as required by the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act Improvements Act of 2015, OSHA has increased the maximum civil penalties on employers cited for safety violations. The annual penalty increases are required by the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act Improvements Act of 2015 (ACT) and apply to Federal OSHA states. Information on the change can be found here.

Random Inspection

Late last year OSHA announced it would implement its Site Specific Targeting 2016 inspection plan, which applies to non-construction workplaces with more than 20 employees. Employers who failed to provide 2016 Form 300A data to OSHA will be selected at random and added to an inspection list combined with employers who reported high rates of days away, restricted, or transfer in 2016. OSHA will include a random sample of employers with low rates to the list. The collected data will be used to create inspection lists.

Drone Inspection

Midway through 2018 OSHA began gradually implementing a new policy of inspecting workplace inspections utilizing drones. The organization issued a memo authorizing compliance officers to inspect areas that are inaccessible or pose a safety risk, with 2019 being the first full year of this practice being implemented. Compliance officers must obtain consent from an employer and notice must be provided to employees before the drone is launched.

Tracking of Workplace Injuries and Illnesses

For workplaces with 250 or more employees, OSHA now only requires an electronic submission of OSHA Form 300A. Facilities should continue to record workplace injuries and illnesses and follow reporting requirements, but OSHA amended its record-keeping regulation to remove the requirement to electronically submit information from OSHA Form 300 (log of work-related injuries and illnesses) and OSHA Form 301 (injury and illness incident report). However, the requirement to keep and maintain OSHA Forms 300, 300A, and 301 for five years is not changed.

Keeping up with regulations and requirements is key to avoiding shut downs and lost business costs. By implementing policies, holding staff accountable, and staying abreast of safety regulations you can positively contribute to your business’ bottom line. For more tips on how to optimize safety practices in your facility, read our white paper Six Keys to Managing Workplace Electrical Safety.