Investing in the future: collective thinking in facility design






Future-proofing facilities while leveraging previous investments

A new generation of facilities are being designed and constructed around the globe. A key facility design challenge is ensuring the systems and infrastructure involved will not only deliver new advantage but also function seamlessly with (and add value to) the other parts of a company’s ecosystem, including legacy systems and existing capital projects. Old and new primary investments need to work together harmoniously to deliver a more productive and profitable future.

Future-Proofed Facility Design White Paper

READ THE WHITE PAPER: Why state-of-the-art facilities require state-of-the-art infrastructure

In this age of digital transformation, data underpins modern business, connectivity is key, and operational scaling is a fact of life. This is why corporate facilities in banking, finance, and any other sector are being conceived to take advantage of the opportunities offered by this new landscape. Getting the infrastructure right, the strongest underpinning, is crucial. Continuing with the banking example, companies such as HSBC, JP Morgan Chase, Crédit Suisse and CitiBank (or their outsourcing partners) are doing precisely that.

The data center, now evolving into next-gen digital infrastructure architecture, has provided the core of banking operations for generations. Today, such data centers are expected to work smarter and do more to process and store vastly increased volumes of data, globally, quicker than ever. They must be always available, with no delays.

As a result, global heads of facilities and real estate want assurances they are investing in the right technical infrastructure, maximizing the ability of the organization’s IT to, for instance, deploy workload in the right places, and deliver the right services to users and customers at the right time (and at the right price) – integrating with still-valuable legacy systems where necessary. This requires technology that is both reliable and flexible, based on global standards, as well as working with acknowledged leaders in the field.

At a basic level, it can mean tried-and-tested cabling – the strongest physical foundations – and ensuring an overall standards-based approach that is not only optimized for interoperability and performance but also addresses a multitude of other facilities (and cost) requirements, from energy efficiency to cooling optimization, even space considerations. By looking at the bigger picture and applying joined-up thinking when making technology choices that affect facility design, facilities and real estate leaders – in partnership with IT and procurement teams – can ensure both connectivity and investment protection. This, in turn, can have a real impact on the bottom line as infrastructure converges, data volumes increase exponentially, and the pace of business continues to speed up.

To find out more about how you can future-proof your facilities while leveraging previous investments, read our report, “Why State-of-the-art Facilities Require State-of-the-art Infrastructure.”

Case Study: Purdue’s New University Network Infrastructure

Panduit’s Innovative Wireless Solution Enhances Purdue’s University Network Infrastructure

Image of case study cover

The average college student steps onto campus with approximately eight devices and expects seamless wireless connectivity for each one. Aware of the increasing demand for wireless access, Purdue University invested in a wireless infrastructure that included deployment of 1,200 wireless access points. The initial project targeted areas where students congregate but as the use of wireless devices continued to grow, the university network infrastructure needed to expand to accommodate an enhanced wireless service.

Challenge

This was no small effort. The university network infrastructure needed to serve more than 40,400 students and nearly 16,500 staff members and their wireless devices. It also needed to accommodate the university’s existing 149-year-old physical footprint. We were up to the task, providing an enterprise solution that included our structured cabling system and surface raceway to secure and route the structured cabling throughout the campus.

Solution

Working with Purdue, we helped design a solution that meets IEEE performance standards while increasing capacity and incorporating as many existing raceways as possible. Because we are experts at eliminating alien crosstalk at a reduced diameter, Purdue was able to run 116 28-Gauge cables in a space that would only allow 47 traditional cables.

Result

These days, bandwidth is plentiful for Purdue students and staff, with nearly 8,600 high-performance, reliable wireless access points across the campus. What’s more, in addition to 100% wireless capacity, Purdue provided one wired access point per student in the dorms using Panduit Ethernet jacks and Purdue’s color–old gold.

See How Panduit Did It

Learn how Purdue University stayed connected: Read the full case study.

IoT Platform Sensors: 5 Characteristics To Explore

Sensors and IoT Platforms

Much has been written about the promise of predictive analytics and how IoT data can improve operational efficiency, reduce downtime, and save money for the enterprise. In contrast, little is written about the sensors gathering the data that is fed into the predictive analytics engine. Panduit’s white paper, “E.S.P. for IoT Platforms,” discusses the characteristics to consider when deploying measurement sensors and how to determine the importance of specifications depending on sensor type and deployment location.

Sensor Types

There are three types of sensors: indicators, counters, and measurement.

  1. Indicators are relatively straight forward – they are either on or off. They show when something has occurred, for example, when someone has opened and accessed a panel.
  2. Counters can keep a running tally of a series of events. An example is a tachometer that counts the number of revolutions of a shaft or axle. Both indicators and counters are examples of digital sensors. They monitor and report discrete events. Relatively speaking, they are simple sensors.
  3. Measurement sensors are more sophisticated. They report on the amount of a physical entity, such as weight, or on an environmental attribute, such as temperature. Rather than reporting discrete events, they report where one is on a continuous scale.

Sensor Characteristics

When choosing sensors for your IoT platform, there are five characteristics you should consider.

  1. Accuracy
    Accuracy is the ability of a sensor to provide a true measurement of whatever the sensor is monitoring. There is an uncertainty with the measurement, usually represented as a percentage of full scale.
  2. Repeatability
    Repeatability is the ability of a sensor to provide a constant output when there is a constant input, when acquiring a new sample.
  3. Linearity
    Linearity is a measure of how well the sensor’s response curve approaches a straight line.
  4. Sensitivity
    A sensor’s sensitivity is the amount the input to the sensor must change to detect any change in the output.
  5. Environmental Impact
    Changes in the environment can impact the performance and accuracy of a sensor. For example, some sensors are particularly sensitive to temperature and humidity.

When selecting a sensor, you should also determine which attributes are important to your application. In a benign environment, the environmental impact on the sensor’s performance may not be that important, whereas it may be a consideration if the application is outdoors.

The tradeoff you need to make when selecting a measurement sensor is the level of specificity you require for that attribute versus cost. For example, a temperature sensor monitoring a pizza oven does not need to be as accurate as one monitoring a pharmaceutical process. A temperature sensor with an accuracy of ±0.01°C will be more expensive than one with an accuracy of ±1°C.

To learn more about why sensors are important for your IoT platform, download Panduit’s
E.S.P. for IoT Platforms” white paper – or subscribe to our blog to access all the papers in our IoT “101” white paper series.

One-Step Automation to Supersede Multiple Manual Tests

Machine-driven outages at the factory are an expensive spanner in the works, so planned maintenance shutdown is critical in limiting machine glitches and production downtime. But in practice, equipment servicing isn’t always as frequently or regularly scheduled as desired. Why? Because planned servicing can be very resource taxing to the business.

Turnaround maintenance is highly orchestrated endeavor, as different internal teams, third-party technicians and contractors work concurrently on multiple machines for diverse servicing. An incident at any point in the operation can significantly impact turnaround cost, speed and safety.

Factory owners and operators will be pleased to know that machine maintenance just got easier. Panduit’s new VeriSafe absence of voltage tester (AVT) is bringing NFPA 70E-compliant automated testing and verification of energy discharge for lockout safety – to supersede the lengthy and complex manual tests – in as little as 10 seconds, and at no risk to the user.

5 Reasons Why VeriSafe Automatically Supersedes the Manual Process

1. Standardized and consistent testing
Manual testing is conducted on handheld tools, such as non-contact voltage tester for the first test, a digital, non-solenoid, electrical tester for the second test and a multi-meter with a low-impedance for live-dead-live test, and results can vary depending which tool the electrician chooses, his familiarity with its use, whether the tool is correctly used, and what is its state of maintenance and calibration as the time of use.

VeriSafe however, is permanently mounted on the electrical enclosure of the machine and will consistently run the standardized test sequence when activated – which automatically verifies the phase conductor or circuit part for both phase-to-phase and phase-to-ground, as well as check for both AC and DC voltage as a standard.

2. No exposure to electrical hazards
On the handheld process, the electrician can only know if energy discharge is successful after opening the electrical enclosure and going through the respective tests in exacting steps. But that means putting himself at risk of an arc flash upon opening of the enclosure, if the level of voltage present is still sufficiently high.

VeriSafe has provisions to ensure direct contact with the circuit at time of testing, while preventing hazardous voltage from reaching the mounted surface by way of an isolation module. Because the push button sits at the outside of the enclosure, the user will not be exposed to electrical hazards when activating the process.

3. Easy testing in difficult-to-access locations
It is cumbersome and time-consuming for electricians to test for absence of voltage in hard-to-reach enclosures, or in crowded or complex layouts that make using handhelds difficult. VeriSafe’s flexibility for different mounting and testing/detection applications makes it much easier to work in the tightest of spaces – which is also a significant advantage in shop floor design, as having more compliant options for placing capital assets means facility layout can be made more efficient.

4. Streamlined and simplified testing
The manual verification process is complicated, including different steps and checks within the general process to:

1. Select the tester
2. Test the tester
3. Check for voltage
4. Retest the tester
5. Perform work

VeriSafe begins with a simple activation and ends with the green light to open the panel, as the middle steps are completely automated based on the recommendations of NFPA 70E.

5. Error-less process
The problem with manual testing is the potential for errors that ranges the gamut, from human oversights and mistakes, to instrumentation fault, to possible missteps or omissions in the testing sequence, and more. Such is the over reliance on the electrician’s experience and skill to complete the job, which cannot be a comforting thought for the said worker, the maintenance staff, or the company.

VeriSafe’s automated process and single step activation are standardized to avoid missteps in execution and sequence. It is further constructed to resist factors that could affect its accuracy and functionality – such as mechanical or electrical failures from wear, mechanical shock and environmental extremes.

Standards Update: 28 AWG, MPTL Now Compliant!

When Panduit introduced 28 AWG patch cords to the market in 2011, we knew we were on to something big. When we showed customers and contractors the skinny patch cords, they were amazed by the sheer size and flexibility of the cords. At the time, they might not have fully realized the impact the cords could have in overcrowded telco rooms, but nonetheless, they were impressed.

28 AWG Patch CordsHowever, while the cords met all the performance requirements of the copper cabling standards (with reduced channel lengths), they didn’t meet the wire gauge requirements of the standard, which required 22-26 AWG wires. Hence the 28 AWG patch cords were not fully standards compliant. Because of the huge size advantages and minimum channel length reductions, most Panduit customers adopted the 28 AWG cords. However, even after 7 years on the market, some customers remain hesitant or flat out refuse to try them, as they want a solution that is fully standards-compliant.

Compliance Achieved!

Today, Panduit is excited to be able to say that 28 AWG patch cords are FULLY COMPLIANT with copper cabling standards. ANSI/TIA-568.2-D, the Balanced Twisted-Pair Telecommunications Cabling and Components Standard, has been revised to include 28 AWG patch cords. The revised standard is expected to be published this month.

The revision was developed by the TIA TR-42.7 Copper Cabling Systems Subcommittee, which I’m a member of. The effort to get 28 AWG included wasn’t a small feat. In fact, this represents the culmination of two years of work by a broad spectrum of companies and individuals. During our discussions, it was apparent the committee members see the value the small cords bring. As more and more building systems are networked, space in TRs is at a premium. Everyone is looking for ways they can squeeze more into their space and 28 AWG is an easy, inexpensive way to help make that happen.

At Panduit, we’ve been beating this drum for a while now. We’ve seen firsthand the impact 28 AWG cords have made in TRs. We’ve heard from customers how they have been able to add devices but keep the same pathways because of the reduced size. We have contractors telling us how the smaller size and flexibility have simplified moves, adds, and changes. And, we’ve seen other manufacturers jump on the bandwagon. In short, the industry has embraced 28 AWG patch cords.

Modular Plug Terminated Links Added to Standard Also

Along with the addition of 28 AWG patch cords, the revised standard also recognizes modular plug terminated links (MPTLs). MPTLs are essentially permanent links that have field terminated plugs on one end, instead of a typical jack-to-jack permanent link. Although installers have used this method for years, a new breed of MPTL plugs have entered the market, including Panduit’s new Field Terminated Plug. These plugs are designed specifically for connecting the growing number of networked devices that are going into buildings. The standard revision allows for field testing of MPTLs – something that hasn’t been possible previously. With field testing using a recognized and reputable tester, the installer can be assured that the channel that includes the MPTL meets applicable Category 5e, 6 or 6A performance requirements to support data rates of 1G and higher.

MPTLs are a key component in today’s digital building, allowing quick and easy connections for cameras, access points, lights and more. As additional systems are added to the network, MPTL use will continue to grow. The addition of this new connector to the standard solidifies the continued use of MPTLs going forward.

If standards compliance is an issue for your organization, now’s your chance to try these connectivity solutions in your buildings and see the big difference yourself. Reach out to your distributor or your Panduit account manager to see these in person if you haven’t already.

Safer Absence of Voltage Testing Begins with Simplicity

VeriSafe – Absence of Voltage Tester

There’s an interesting new exception in the 2018 edition of the tri-yearly NFPA 70E Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace for the use of an Absence of Voltage Tester (AVT) in place of handheld instruments.

In Asia Pacific, NFPA is the commonly referenced standard for mitigating electrical hazards in lock-out/tag-out (LOTO) practices. This exception opens plants and factories in the region to new opportunities in improving safety programs and planned maintenance efficiency.

Here’s why.

In factory machine servicing, the LOTO guidelines protect maintenance staff from electrical hazards, by mandating that an electrical professional first verify the absence of voltage, before maintenance, service or inspection work can begin. However, the guidelines don’t articulate the removal of the hazard, only in transferring the risk from the maintenance staff to the electrician.

This is not an ideal workaround, as no one knows if the energy discharge has been successful without first opening the electrical enclosure for tests. As such, the risk of the electrician getting a painful electrical shock or even dangerous arc flash, remains.

The beauty of an AVT then, is in how it overcomes the dilemma.

INTRODUCING AVT FOR SIMPLICITY
Panduit has recently released the first full-featured AVT product to general availability, and it is game-changing in its innovative approach to an old problem.

Called VeriSafe, the SIL rated, NFPA 70E-2018 120.5 (7) Exception 1 compliant AVT is permanently installed on the electrical enclosure of the equipment that it is testing for. Sitting on the panel door between the circuit and the outside of the enclosure, the self-contained unit consists of a testing and isolation component on the inside of the door, and a push button that faces externally.

The user pushes the button to activate the device, which runs an automated sequence of in-built pre-/post-verification tests, such as phase-to-phase and phase-to-ground testing for AC and DC voltage – to arrive at an active indication in as quickly as ten seconds!

What’s more, VeriSafe ships with a connectivity option as a standard. This allows smart facilities that run software management systems to draw essential logs and alerts from a connected VeriSafe device in real-time.

THE VERISAFE IMPACT
To plants and factories, safety pays. Electrical injuries can account for one of the highest average workers’ compensation costs, second only to motor vehicle accidents. Although estimates vary, studies indicate the average direct cost of an electrical injury ranges US$50,000 to $80,000, while indirect cost can exceed these numbers by a factor of nearly four, to include:

• Wages paid during work stoppage
• Administrative costs related to injury
• Property damage and repair
• Training and compensation for replacement workers
• Lost productivity with less experienced workers
• Lost productivity from low staff morale
• Fines related to workplace safety violations
• Potential increase in absenteeism

Because VeriSafe diffuses electrical risks right at the start, every potential incident avoided can translate to massive savings from side stepping a string of personal injury, and property and equipment damage costs.

VeriSafe also makes the absence of voltage testing more accurate and far less risky than the manual process – as its standardized, compliant and automated approach leaves little room for error on an effectively reduced workflow. With VeriSafe AVT installed in all high-risk machinery, large-scale facility lifecycle management activities can experience a cumulation of cost and time savings, to significantly benefit high-pressure events, such as a maintenance turnaround.

For more information, please visit www.panduit.com/verisafe

Building the next-gen data centre: global, connected, ready for business






With modern business defined by data and by connectivity, tomorrow’s data centre will bear little resemblance to today’s models.

What we currently think of as a data centre is being superseded by next-gen digital infrastructure architecture: global in scale and defined by the business services it delivers and the user/consumer requirements that it satisfies. According to a recent Gartner, Inc. report, infrastructure and operations people tasked with data centres will have to focus on “enabling rapid deployment of business services and deploying workloads to the right locations, for the right reasons, at the right price”.

These super-charged requirements, and that unstoppable focus on data, mean the most robust, reliable and flexible infrastructure – physical, electrical and network – will be paramount. Gartner also added that, by 2025, eighty percent of enterprises will have shut down their traditional data centre versus ten percent today. The key word is “traditional”.

With the rise of next-gen digital infrastructure architecture, workload placement becomes a critical driver of successful digital delivery. That, in turn, is underpinned by performance, availability, latency, scalability, and so on. Indeed, Gartner suggests an “ecosystem” is required to enable “scalable, agile infrastructures”.

What’s the best way to engage with this era of digital transformation, interconnect services, cloud, edge services and Internet of Things (IoT) if you’re planning or preparing to replace your data centre? The optimum digital infrastructure architecture (aka modern data centre) to meet requirements for the next five, ten or 15 years will, as ever, depend on each organisation’s priorities. There’s no simple answer. For some, a major step will be to ensure the strongest physical foundations including cabling, pathways and security. Many organisations will need an effective way to “bridge the gap” from old-world data centre and stacks into converged networks and infrastructure. At the same time, data centre infrastructure management tools can help improve energy efficiency and reduce costs. Perhaps a through line in all situations is ensuring the right connectivity solutions: to increase network throughput, reduce latency, improve agility, ensure scalability, and so on. That way, you’re not only ready for opportunities presented by the Internet of Things – you’ll be ready for the Internet of Everything.

To learn more about ensuring you have the right connectivity solutions at your core, read the report: https://pages.panduit.com/finance-all.html

The Potential for A Technological Revolution Requires Wire Harness Standards Harmonization

Whether you’re talking about the automotive, energy or telecom industry, standards have been the core of every technological revolution. Now, with the recent publication of ANSI/UL 62275, wire harness manufacturing can finally experience its own.

Up until now wire assembly has been a very manual industry, relying heavily on people and processes to manufacture the materials. But with ANSI/UL 62275’s adoption of IEC 62275 in the U.S. and harmonizing of CSA C22.2 No. 62275 (Canada), NMX-J-623-ANCE (Mexico) and IEC 62278 (Europe), a substantial opportunity has appeared for manufacturers to promote high value, consistent quality, and a safe and efficient application.

Regional standards bodies around the world.

The harmonization of wire harness standards includes participation from several regional standards bodies.


This harmonized standard for cable ties for electrical installations – including plastic and metallic cable ties, mounts and integral cable tie mounts – will provide wire harness component manufacturers test procedures to conduct rigorous tensile strength, minimum operating and installation temperature, vibration, corrosion, flame and plenum tests, among others, through one organization.

As a result, when a global component supplier is selected to ship to the U.S., Canada, Mexico, Europe, or other regions that accept these harmonized standards, customers can be assured of the delivery of a product that is high quality and of performance at lower installed costs with reduced risks. Without harmonization, a wire processing company may be required to use different products based on the end destination.

Base standards for wire management products have historically always included regional standards from the Association of Standardization and Certification (ANCE Mexico), ANSI/UL Underwriters Laboratories-US, CSA Group (CSA Canada) or EN/IEC (European Standards), resulting in varying benchmarks for compliance testing and certifications. Due to this complexity, wire management customers have not always had the consistent benchmark of performance and quality that they deserve, which has often resulted in unexpected total business costs.

Now, by reducing the number of separate standards and testing requirements, high quality and product performance based on the successful completion of test standards has been ensured. While all regional standards ANCE, CSA, IEC and UL have a stability date of December 2018, updated standards will be introduced in 2019. As this switchover nears, it is vital that we start educating customers on these requirements now.

Ahead of the anticipated changes customers need to learn the benefits for their applications. Not only will this provide customers with better products, but we believe that the availability of this harmonized standard will encourage a whole new host of innovation across different sectors – from energy to military and defense and aerospace, to medical devices to the broader industrial market.

History shows that we all win by embracing standards harmonization. Now is the time for implementation and education so that innovation can be right around the corner.

To learn more about how ANSI UL 62275 will forever improve the wire management industry, watch our webinar, Why Global Standards Harmonization is Critical for the Future of Wire Harness.

Elmhurst Memorial Healthcare Uses Technology to Provide Superior Patient Care

A Robust Network Infrastructure Allows for Patient-Centered Care

A robust network infrastructure allows for patient-centered care.

 

The future is here – but not all hospitals have the infrastructure to embrace it. So, when Elmhurst Memorial Healthcare rebuilt with a commitment to patient-centered care, they turned to Panduit for network infrastructure and connectivity solutions.

Challenge

The hospital needed to design a future-forward backbone for its enterprise to accommodate the 178,000-square-foot, four-story main hospital and to connect:

  • physician offices
  • outpatient healthcare services
  • surgical suites
  • the medical office building (80,000 square foot)

Solution

To accomplish this task, Elmhurst Memorial Healthcare relied on Panduit’s enterprise and data center network infrastructure solutions to create a campus-wide network that places the most advanced equipment and techniques in the hands of top medical talent.

Panduit enabled:

  • On-site telecom rooms and data center
  • Fast and secure data transmission
  • Efficient Power over Ethernet
  • Reliable wireless capabilities

Panduit’s TX6A™ 10Gig copper and Opticom® fiber backbone ensure that the entire care team can securely view medical records and test results simultaneously, regardless of location.

In addition, Panduit’s cabinet and cable management products organize and protect critical equipment and cabling from environmental hazards such as dust, heat, and humidity. Panduit’s FiberRunner® cable management system enables customers to manage, organize, and properly route their cables, saving space and ensuring optimal network operation.

Result

With Panduit’s help, Elmhurst Memorial Healthcare now makes technology decisions based on medical and business needs, not infrastructure limitations.

See the infographic case study.

 

 

Key Indicators for Evaluating a Wire Harness Partner

As wire harnesses become increasingly more complex in both scope and scale, wire harness manufacturers can look to leverage the latest assembly innovations to increase their profitability while following strict quality standards to deliver a quality finished product to their end customer. As new research demonstrates, the demand for wire harness assemblies is beginning to exceed the manufacturers’ capacity. Finding the right wire harness solutions partner has never been more critical.

Quality, consistency, and speed are paramount to the success of a wire harness manufacturer. There are several factors that will determine whether a wire harness manufacturer can deliver on these key indicators:

1. COMPLIANCE WITH KEY INDUSTRY STANDARDS AND REGULATIONS
Wire harness assembly has traditionally relied on manual processes to manufacture and assemble the final product, leaving room for workmanship variances and quality errors. Beyond the regulations providing safety for those involved in the assembly process, a great deal of work has been done to drive quality into the manufacturing process to ensure that a safe and reliable product is delivered to the end customer.

Depending on the region you’re in, you may hear responses ranging from IPC/WHMA to ANCE to CSA to IEC and UL. You can learn more about the industry’s upcoming move to global standards harmonization by registering for our upcoming webinar on August 7 at 1pm CDT.

2. CUSTOMIZATION OR TURN-KEY?
Flexibility in wire harness manufacturing often refers to the ability to quickly deliver customized solutions. As manufacturing becomes more time sensitive, wire harness manufacturers are leveraging new technology to meet that demand. Traditional nail and board wire harness boards don’t always provide the required level of speed and flexibility. The introduction of Modular systems have helped reduce the cost of assembly material, allow for rapid prototyping and job changeover, as well as free up precious production space that was once used to store harness boards.

3. FOCUS ON THROUGHPUT
With wire harness manufacturing being a hands-on industry, the ability to focus – and deliver – on a fast turnaround is essential. As reaction time becomes a bigger part of the industry, the ability to automate the more manual aspects of an assembly will help determine the winners and losers in the industry. One example – automated cable tie installation – reinforces that automation most readily applies to processes that rely on repetitive actions, and that will apply across the most wire harness assemblies.

For decades, Pandit has invented and created wire harness solutions for some of the most important manufacturing processes in the world. Panduit offers comprehensive solutions for wire harness manufacturers, working with leaders across the industry, including:

  • Wire Harness Manufacturers Association – The Wiring Harness Manufacturer’s Association® (WHMA) was established in 1993 to serve and dedicate their resources to the global cable and wire harness industry. WHMA is the ONLY trade association exclusively representing the cable and wire harness manufacturing industry including manufacturers, their suppliers and customers.
  • Cirris Systems – For more than 30 years, Cirris has specialized in cable and harness testing for thousands of applications across consumer devices, hospital and medical equipment, aerospace and more.
  • Delta Sigma Company – An ISO 9001:2008 registered company located in Kennesaw Georgia, Delta Sigma Company specializes in developing systems and tools to automate large, complex, precision assembly and manufacturing processes.
  • Gem Gravure – For over 60 years, Gem Gravure has provided quality printing technology and fluids for marking wire and cable creating product combinations for everything from bottling craft brews to manufacturing electronics.
  • Schleuniger – Schleuniger is a leading international manufacturer of high-precision cable processing machines.
  • Telsonic Ultrasonics – Since 1966, Telsonic Ultrasonics has been a specialist in industrial ultrasonic technology. Telsonic Ultrasonics are certified according to ISO 9001 (SQS) and applies lean production principles.

For more information, read our latest eBook, Best Practices in Wire Harness Manufacturing: Your Guide to Increasing Productivity and Profitability.